Thai Lending – Evason Phuket http://evasonphuket.com/ Sat, 25 Sep 2021 04:12:29 +0000 en-US hourly 1 https://wordpress.org/?v=5.8 https://evasonphuket.com/wp-content/uploads/2021/06/icon.png Thai Lending – Evason Phuket http://evasonphuket.com/ 32 32 Fine arts in Vermont | Vermont art https://evasonphuket.com/fine-arts-in-vermont-vermont-art/ https://evasonphuket.com/fine-arts-in-vermont-vermont-art/#respond Sat, 25 Sep 2021 04:00:00 +0000 https://evasonphuket.com/fine-arts-in-vermont-vermont-art/ AR Market: Meryl Lebowitz, until November 30th, “A Way from Reality”, abstract paintings, “ARTE at AR”, 159 N. Main St., Barre, 802-479-7069, www.studioplacearts.com Studio Place Arts: Rock Solid XXI, until October 30th, stone sculptures and assemblages by local artists; Austin Furtake-Cole’s Moves, second floor gallery; “Crafted Narratives” by Rob Millard-Menendez, gallery on the third floor; […]]]>

AR Market: Meryl Lebowitz, until November 30th, “A Way from Reality”, abstract paintings, “ARTE at AR”, 159 N. Main St., Barre, 802-479-7069, www.studioplacearts.com

Studio Place Arts: Rock Solid XXI, until October 30th, stone sculptures and assemblages by local artists; Austin Furtake-Cole’s Moves, second floor gallery; “Crafted Narratives” by Rob Millard-Menendez, gallery on the third floor; “In the Current” by Gail Skudera, until October 16, Quick Change Gallery, SPA, 201 N. Main St., Barre; 802-479-7069, www.studioplacearts.com Hours of Operation: 11.30am to 5pm Wednesday-Friday; Saturday 11:30 a.m. to 4:00 p.m. and by appointment.

Bennington Museum: Boundless, through December 31, new paintings and mixed media by Dusty Boynton; “Robert Frost: Currently in Vermont,” Frost’s life and work as a poet and farmer in Bennington County through Nov. 7, 1920-1938; Love, Marriage and Divorce, through December 31, the ups and downs of love and heartbreak, from Victorian wedding dresses to scandalous stories of sexual harassment, 75 Main St., Bennington, 802-447-1571, www.benningtonmuseum. org

Compass Music and Arts Center: Laura King, until November 24th, “Fenceposts Mark a Path”, over 100 works that represent a journey of discovery and reflection during the pandemic winter of 2021, by artist and educator, 333 Jones Drive, Brandon, 802 -247-4295, www.cmacvt.org Opening times: Monday to Friday 10 a.m. to 5 p.m.

Brattleboro Museum & Art Center: Expedition through October 11, works by various artists, many of whom have never been shown in Vermont before; “Sequences: Ode to Minor White”, group exhibition of contemporary works that reflect the aesthetic and philosophical ideas of the photographer, writer and educator Minor White (1908-1976); “Delano Dunn: Novelties”, the artist’s first solo museum exhibition, brings together two groups of works that deal with love, racial identity, family history and the experience of creating art during quarantine; Charlie Hunter: Semaphore focuses on the Bellows Falls painter’s precisely rendered images of anachronistic railroad structures; “Erick Johnson: Double Take,” an immersive installation that integrates his paintings with his Instagram feed, which often shows images of patterned objects found on the streets of New York, Union Station, Main Street (Route 5) and Route 119 and 142, Brattleboro. 802-257-0124, www.brattleboromuseum.org

BCA Center: “Bubblegum Pop”, until October 10th, which combines popular and consumer culture with fantastic topics; Kaylynn TwoTrees, through October 10, immersive installation by the Vermont artist, Burlington City Arts, 135 Church St., Burlington, 802-865-7551, www.burlingtoncityarts.com

UVM Fleming Museum: Learning Studio, until December 10, “Creating Conversations with Art”; Storytelling Salon, until December 10th, “Voices Creating Change”; “Abstracts”, until December 10th, Opening Space for Imagination “:” Absence “, ongoing,” Seeing and Unseeing “the Flemings collection, 61 Colchester Ave., Burlington, 802-656-0750 (Info: 656-2090), www.flemingmuseum.org

Kent Museum: “20/20 Hindsight: Seeing the Past Anew with Contemporary Art”, through October 10, thematic exhibition offers a contemporary look at methods and materials used to develop rural culture in the late 19th century in Vermont, Kents Corner , Calais, 802-223-6613, www.kentscorner.org The exhibition is open for weekly viewing: Friday-Sunday from 10 a.m. to 5 p.m. or by appointment. The final reception is Sunday, October 10th from 3pm to 5pm. Free presale tickets are recommended.

Rokeby Museum: “A Modern Artist: The Commercial Art of Rachael Robinson Elmer”, until October 24, modern artist who embarked on the expanding profession of commercial artist at the beginning of the 20th century; Free & Safe: The Underground Railroad in Vermont, Continuous Educational Trail and Farm Buildings, 4334 Route 7, Ferrisburgh, 802-877-3406, rokeby.org

The Hyde Collection: “Summer Bomb Pop: Collections in Dialogue”, until October 31, 17 contemporary abstract paintings paired with works of the 20th century from the Hyde’s Feibes & Schmitt Collection; Masterpieces & Mysteries, through October 31, Artistic Treasures and Art History Questions from the Vaults, 161 Warren St., Glens Falls, NY, 518-792-1761, hydecollection.org

Bread & Puppet Museum, through November 1st fantastic collection of dolls of all sizes, from hand puppets to giant puppets for parades and circuses filling a renovated barn from the 1860s, Route 122, Glover, 802-525-3031, www.breadandpuppet .org Opening times: daily from 10 a.m. to 6 p.m. and after the shows; Admission is free (donations are welcome).

Museum of Everyday Life: “Life in Lists and Notes, through May 22, 2022, which celebrates the poetic, mnemonic, narrative, and enumerative qualities of lists and notes, and their myriad of creative, professional, bureaucratic, institutional, domestic, and personal qualities explored usage over time, 3482 Dry Pond Road (Route 16, Glover, www.museumofeverydaylife.org

Highland Center: Still Life, Life Still, through October 15, photographs by Mary Ellen Bartley and paintings by Kate Emlen, Tucker Nichols, Jon Redmond, and Margaret Sparrow, Highland Center for the Arts, 2875 Hardwick St., Greensboro, 802 -533-3000, highlandartsvt.org

Hood Museum of Art: Jaune Quick-to-See Smith: Trade Canoe: Forty Days and Forty Nights, through December 12; “Form and Relationship: Contemporary Indigenous Ceramics”, through January 2; “A Legacy to Learn: The Jane and Raphael Bernstein Collection,” through February 6; Thornton Dial: The Tiger Cat, September 11th to February. 27, Dartmouth College, 4 E. Wheelock St., Hanover, NH, 603-646-1110, hoodmuseum.dartmouth.edu

Bryan Memorial Gallery: Land and Light and Water and Air 2021, through November 7th traditional New England landscape paintings by over 70 member artists; “Let Us Introduce You” until November 7th, works by established artists Jane Ashley, Amy Hook-Therrien, Lisa Miceli, Jen Violette and Liane Whittum, 180 Main St., Jeffersonville, 802-644-5100, www.bryangallery .org

NVU-Johnson State College: Susan Abbot, through October 29, “In Place”, new paintings by the Vermont artist, Julian Scott Memorial Gallery, Dibden Center for the Arts, Northern Vermont University-Johnson, 337 College Hill, Johnson, 802 – 635-1481, northvermont.edu artist reception, 3 to 5 p.m. Thursday, September 30th.

AVA Gallery: Four solo exhibitions until October 1st. Winkie Kelsey: “Rocks to Galaxies”; William Peabody: “A Collection of Memories”; Jay Singh: “From then to now”; Coralea Wennberg: “Plant Stories”, 1 Bank St., Lebanon, NH, 603-448-3117, www.avagallery.org

Satellite Gallery: Barclay Tucker, through September 30th, “The Play’s the Thing,” fun work by the illustrator and NVU Lybdon art professor, Satellite Gallery & Community Space, 71 Depot St., Lyndonville, thesatellitegalleryvt.weebly.com

Southern Vermont Arts Center: Fall / Winter Membership Show, Oct. Nov. 2, 28, featuring work by over 200 artists; “Our Tangled Choices: Art and the Environment” until November 14th, work by Pat Musick and Michelle Lougee; Solo Exhibitions 2020: Late Summer through Sep 26, 10 artists working in a range of media including mokuhanga (Japanese woodblock print), photography, welded metal art, egg tempera painting, ceramics and more, Yester House, 930 SVAC Drive, Manchester, 802-362- 1405, www.svac.org Vernissage, 2 p.m. to 4 p.m. Saturday, October 2nd.

Stella Quarta Decima: “Anticipation”, until October, with the artists Matthew Monk, James Rauchman, Diane Sophrin, Hannah Morris, Kate Burnim and Lynn Newcomb, SQD Gallery, 3568 Main St., Manchester, www.stellaquartadecima.com

Edgewater Gallery at the Falls: “Locally Grown”, through October 31st, Woody Jackson, Sara Katz and Sage Tucker-Ketcham bring perspectives to our landscape, 1 Mill St., Middlebury, 802-458-0098, edgewatergallery.co

Edgewater Gallery on the Green: “Still Life / Life Stills” until September 30th, two-person show with Kimberlee Alemian and Lori Mehta, 6 Merchants Rowe, Middlebury, 802-989-7419, edgewatergallery.co

Henry Sheldon Museum: “Henry at 22: Collector. Museum Founder & More ”, through December 31, Artifacts, 1 Park St., Middlebury, 802 388-2117, www.henrysheldonmuseum.org

Town Hall Theater: The Dreaming of Timbuctoo exhibit runs through October 31st to reveal the little-known history of Vermont black land ownership, 68 S. Pleasant St., Middlebury, 802-388-1436, townhalltheater.org

The Front Gallery: Cheryl Betz, September, mixed media paintings from five different series started during the pandemic, 6 Barre St., Montpelier, 802-552-0877, www.thefrontvt.com Hours of Operation (limited occupancy): 4 p.m. to 7 p.m. Friday, 11 a.m. to 5 p.m. Saturday and Sunday or by appointment.

TW Wood Gallery: “Pastel Music,” until October 30th, work of the Vermont Pastel Society; Patty Hudak, until October 30th, Botanical Ornaments, Nuquist Gallery, 46 Barre St., Montpelier, 802-262-6035, www.twwoodgallery.org Hours of Operation: Thursday to Saturday 12:00 pm to 4:00 pm or by appointment .

Sage Street Mill: “Las Tres Hermanas (The Three Sisters)” until October 24th, work by Renée Bouchard, Maria Lucia Ferreira and Patricia Burke Pedreira, 29 Sage St., North Bennington, www.sagestreetmill.com

Norwich University: Jennifer Bryan, through December 10, “Liquid Mind: Abstractions,” a work designed to convey current states of mind and visually capture the ups and downs of manic depression, Sullivan Museum and History Center, Northfield, 802-485-2183 , norwich.edu/museum

Chaffee Art Center: Nature Revealed, through October 29, Rutland County Audubon Wildlife Art Exhibit; Steve Halford, through October 29, solo exhibition of raku ceramics, 16 S. Main St. in Rutland, 802-775-0356, www.chaffeeartcenter.org Hours of Operation: Wednesday through Friday 12:00 pm to 4:00 pm; 10 a.m. to 2 p.m. Saturday; and by appointment. 60th annual Art in the Park Festival, 9-10 October.

Catamount Arts: “Open to Landscape”, until September 26th, paintings, photographs and works on paper by Keith Chamberlin, Terry Ekasala, Anni Lorenzini and Elizabeth Nelson, 39 Eastern Ave., St. Johnsbury, 802-748-2600, www .catamountarts.org

Artisans Guild of the Northeast: “Insulating together in wood and wool”, October 1st to November 1st. 13, the arts of Melinda and Ford Evans; The Book Arts Guild of Vermont, through September 25, “The Art of the Book: Is It a Book?” Group show, Back Room Gallery, 430 Railroad St., St. Johnsbury, 802-748-0158, www.nekartisansguild.com

Shelburne Museum: New England Now: People, through October 17, regional contemporary artists celebrate the people of New England, 6000 Shelburne Road (Route 7), Shelburne, 802-985-3346, shelburnemuseum.org Hours of Operation: 10:00 AM to 4 p.m. Wednesday-Sunday. Admission is $ 25, $ 15 for Vermonters, $ 14 for ages 13-17, $ 12 for ages 5 to 12, free under 5.

Lemon Fair Sculpture Park: “Find Your Own Space”, until November, site-specific installation by artist Susan Teare from Essex Junction and other new sculptures, 4547 Route 74, Shoreham, 802-383-8161, www.lemonfairsculpturepark.com

Spruce Peak Performing Arts Center: “Exploring Earth”, through October 31, reflects on the intersection of spirituality and art and celebrates earth magic, nature spirits, animals, plants and transcendence, Altered Spaces Gallery, 122 Hourglass Drive, Stowe, 802 -760- 4634, www.sprucepeakarts.org Opening times: by appointment only.

Tunbridge Public Library: Joan Hoffmann, 26 September-Nov. 21, “Libraries and Barns: Vermont en Plein Air,” acrylic and watercolor by artist South Royalton, 289 Route 110, Tunbridge, 802-889-9404. Vernissage, 3 to 5 p.m. Sunday, September 26; Lecture “Brief History of Plein Air Painting in America 1850-1950”, 7 pm Friday, October 15th.

Mad River Valley Arts: Bill Brauer Retrospective, through October 11, work of the legendary Mad River Valley painter, The Gallery at Mad River Valley Arts, 5031 Main St., Waitsfield, 802-496-6682, madrivervalleyarts.org Hours: 1 to 5 p.m. Wednesday-Saturday.

Carving Studio & Sculpture Center: SculptFest21: “Artifact”, through Oct. 24,636 Marble St., West Rutland, 802-438-2097, www.carvingstudio.org

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Japan promotes the ambitions of a global arts center https://evasonphuket.com/japan-promotes-the-ambitions-of-a-global-arts-center/ https://evasonphuket.com/japan-promotes-the-ambitions-of-a-global-arts-center/#respond Thu, 23 Sep 2021 23:00:00 +0000 https://evasonphuket.com/japan-promotes-the-ambitions-of-a-global-arts-center/ TOKYO – Even from a distance, the collection of golden and black horn-shaped objects immediately catches the eye. Something about the arrangement of the horns, the color scheme and the size of the display that towers in the cave-like hall screams “art”. Those curious enough to get closer are rewarded with the sounds of mysterious […]]]>

TOKYO – Even from a distance, the collection of golden and black horn-shaped objects immediately catches the eye. Something about the arrangement of the horns, the color scheme and the size of the display that towers in the cave-like hall screams “art”.

Those curious enough to get closer are rewarded with the sounds of mysterious whispers emanating from a multitude of speakers. The inappropriateness of encountering such a spectacle in a pristine airport terminal invites you to smile and even marvel. Because “Crowd Cloud” is located at Tokyo’s Haneda International Airport, which is hardly known for its artistic offerings.

“Crowd Cloud” was created by Yuri Suzuki, an artist and designer, and Miyu Hosoi, a music and sound artist, and is part of the Japanese government’s ambitious new project to transform Tokyo into a global arts center.

“As an entry point in Japan, airports like Haneda can convey what Japan has in terms of culture and art, and that is very meaningful,” says Tetsuya Kawabe, Senior Managing Director of the Haneda Future Research Institute, a subsidiary of the Haneda operating company. “Japan has enormous cultural and artistic resources that are underestimated.”

Airports are an ideal place to exhibit art because when people arrive it is “a moment of absolute receptivity,” says Paola Antonelli, senior curator for architecture and design at the Museum of Modern Art in New York and curator of the exhibition at Haneda Airport, known as the “Vision Gate”.

Above: “Crowd Cloud” by Yuri Suzuki, an artist and designer, and Miyu Hosoi, a music / sound artist, is being installed at Tokyo’s Haneda Airport. (Courtesy Takashi Kawashima) Below: One of the public spaces that Japan’s Cultural Affairs Agency uses to display art. (Screenshot from the website “Culture Gate to Japan”)

The project to turn Haneda and other airports into art destinations is part of a long-term goal of the cultural authority to use Japan’s cultural assets, especially its contemporary art, to generate new wealth and international attention. If everything goes according to plan, “we believe a new industry is about to emerge. Culture will be a big industry for Japan,” says Kawabe.

The idea of ​​turning an airport into an arts hub may seem whimsical, but Japan has found creative ways over the years to use art to boost trade.

Department stores, for example, have been an important pillar of the art market, accounting for nearly 35% of domestic art sales in recent years, according to the Japanese art industry market research study 2020.

Above: “The Last of Us”, 2021, by Soimadou Ibrahim. Kotaro Nukaga Gallery, Tokyo. (Photo by Isabel Asha Penzlien) Below: The Fergus McCaffrey Gallery in Tokyo. (Courtesy Fergus McCaffrey)

Last year, department stores that have teams of customer service representatives who know their customers’ tastes sold 67.3 billion yen [$612 million] Art value, a little more than the amount sold in local art galleries, according to the same survey.

Works of art are also used to stimulate the regional economy and the occupancy of hotels and resorts.

The Setouchi Triennial, which takes place on 12 islands in the Seto Inland Sea, attracted nearly 1.2 million visitors during its three sessions in 2019 and, according to the organizers, had a turnover of 18 billion yen.

Despite these efforts, the Japanese art market remains tiny compared to the three major art centers in the world – the US, UK, and China.

Japan is the third largest economy in the world, but its share of the global art market of $ 64.1 billion was only 3.2% in 2019, compared with 44% for the US, 20% for the UK and 18% for China, according to the Art Basel and UBS Global Art Market Report.

Above: Works from Hiroshi Sugimoto’s “Opticks” exhibition in the Koyanagi Gallery in the Ginza district of Tokyo. (© Hiroshi Sugimoto / Courtesy of Gallery Koyanagi) Below: Tokyo’s SCAI the Bathouse Gallery. (Courtesy SCAI das Bathouse)

This has not always been the case. In the late 1980s, during the “bubble economy” when Japanese asset prices soared, Japanese collectors drove art prices soaring by buying great works such as Van Gogh’s “Sunflowers,” owned by Yasuda Fire and Marine Insurance (now Sompo Japan) for a record price of 39.9 million US dollars.

However, since the Japanese asset bubble burst in the early 1990s, interest in buying art has been subdued and only five Japanese collectors made it into the “Top 200 Collectors” list compiled by ARTnews last year.

One problem is that Japan’s tax system does not provide compelling incentives to invest in art, as is the case in the US, where collectors can receive substantial tax deductions for donating art to cultural institutions.

“In Japan there are no financial incentives to encourage people to buy art,” say Misako and Jeffrey Rosen, owners of the Misako & Rosen gallery in Tokyo.

Above: “Memories of Body”, 2021, by Kei Imazu. Anomaly Gallery, Tokyo. (Photo by Keizo Kioku / Courtesy of Anomaly) Below: The museum cone entrance to the Mori Art Museum in Tokyo. (Courtesy of the Mori Art Museum)

Japan also lacks enough sophisticated, affluent people to support art investments, says Naohiko Kishi, assistant director of the Art Tokyo Association and executive producer of Art Fair Tokyo, Japan’s largest art fair.

For most Japanese, the standard of living is so demanding and their everyday life is already filled with so many beautiful objects that “it begs the question: What do you need art for?” according to the gallery owner the Rosens.

However, steps are being taken to stimulate the Japanese art market, particularly by encouraging international collectors to view Japan as a major art destination and building an industry that can generate new wealth to support an aging society.

Poster for Art Fair Tokyo 2021. (Courtesy of Art Fair Tokyo)

In the past year, the regulations were relaxed to mark neighborhoods or even individual buildings as customs zones, in which art can be sold tax-free in galleries, auctions or art fairs, as long as the art is not brought into Japan outside the customs zones.

“We need to encourage the world’s galleries that have been reluctant to come to Japan due to strict regulations to do business here,” Taro Kono, Minister of Administrative Affairs who urged the development of the Japanese art market, told the media last year.

Haneda Airport recently received government approval to become a customs area, and on October 1, one of its halls will host a major auction of contemporary Japanese art, including works by Yayoi Kusama, Yoshitomo Nara and Takashi Murakami.

The idea is that when international galleries and art fairs come to Tokyo, collectors and wealthy travelers will be enticed to visit Japan and “shed light on new, young artists in Japan,” Kono said.

In March, the Agency for Cultural Affairs launched Art Platform Japan, an online resource for information on contemporary Japanese art, much of which is being made available in English for the first time.

At the beginning of November, a new city-wide initiative, Art Week Tokyo, will take place with 50 participating galleries and museums, including the international galleries Blum & Poe and Perrotin, to highlight Tokyo’s potential as an art destination.

Scenes from the 2021 edition of Art Fair Tokyo, Japan’s largest art fair. Taro Kono, Japan’s minister for administrative affairs, told the media last year that when international galleries and art fairs come to Tokyo, collectors and wealthy travelers will be attracted to Japan and “shed light on new young artists in Japan.” (Courtesy Art Fair Tokyo)

“I think Tokyo definitely has a lot of potential,” says Adeline Ooi, Asia Director of Art Basel, the international art fair that advises Art Week Tokyo. “The infrastructure is there, Japan has some of the greatest institutions in the world, a huge taste for culture – and who doesn’t want to go to Tokyo?”

Despite the challenges posed by the coronavirus pandemic, the time is right for Tokyo, says Kishi. With the tough crackdown on the Chinese government in Hong Kong, “people will want to keep their art in a safer place and Tokyo will be respected as a safe place,” he explains.

But in order to develop a large, international art market, the government has to do a lot more, gallery owners say. Coordinated action, including a range of incentives, is needed to make it easier for international galleries to do business in Japan, says Sundaram Tagore, whose New York gallery of the same name represents Hiroshi Senju, a contemporary master of the traditional Nihonga Painting.

In addition to low or no taxes on art sales, Japan could offer rent subsidies and help overcome the language barrier, he says. Efficient logistics, an inviting atmosphere and skilled employees who can work in these galleries are also important.

Above: “Landscapes & Paradise VIII (Poolscapes no. 3)”, 2021, by Hilmi Johandi. Ota Fine Arts Gallery, Tokyo. (© Hilmi Johandi) Below: “LA Reflect”, 2021, by Brian Alfred. Maho Kubota Gallery, Tokyo. (Courtesy Maho Kubota Gallery)

The Rosens suggest that Japanese collectors with significant tax breaks should be encouraged to purchase art. But educating the public about the “value” in art is also vital, as Japanese viewers tend to focus on the visual aspects of a work of art rather than the concept behind the images. Especially with contemporary art, which may require specialist knowledge, this leads to confusion about the value of certain works.

It is also important to cultivate a community of internationally minded critics and collectors who can stimulate discussions about art and culture because “people in the art world want to live in a liberal atmosphere where they can thrive and engage in discourse,” notes Tagore.

Even if Japan succeeds in revitalizing its domestic art market and setting new impulses, it will be crucial to project this image abroad, say critics. In this regard, the role of the media in portraying the vibrant arts scene in Japan is vital. If Japan cannot deliver on multiple fronts, it risks losing to other cities if it becomes an international arts center.

“If you want to build a cosmopolitan city in a post-industrial society, you have to create a world culture,” says Tagore. “Not only Japan, but also other countries have learned that.”

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Jen Stark brings trippy graphics to Brooklyn pop-up https://evasonphuket.com/jen-stark-brings-trippy-graphics-to-brooklyn-pop-up/ https://evasonphuket.com/jen-stark-brings-trippy-graphics-to-brooklyn-pop-up/#respond Wed, 22 Sep 2021 21:48:57 +0000 https://evasonphuket.com/jen-stark-brings-trippy-graphics-to-brooklyn-pop-up/ Jen Stark in her art installation Cascade at William Vale in Brooklyn, NY. Madison McGaw / BFA.com Los Angeles-based artist Jen Stark recently opened a pop-up exhibition in Brooklyn. On the grounds of the William Vale Hotel Williamsburg takes place their digital exhibition entitled cascade, is available now through October 24th. It’s not your average […]]]>

Los Angeles-based artist Jen Stark recently opened a pop-up exhibition in Brooklyn.

On the grounds of the William Vale Hotel Williamsburg takes place their digital exhibition entitled cascade, is available now through October 24th.

It’s not your average pop-up. Stroll through a 6,000-square-meter space, where each room is dedicated to a different visual signature, be it stripes, clusters of colors, or trippy circles. Most of the works shown here are projected onto the white walls, although some sense movement and follow you as you move.

This project, initiated by Art Market Productions, is the artist’s most ambitious to date. She has worked with computer programmers trained in augmented reality and projection mapping to create a kaleidoscopic, technically colored experience. The graphics change over time and the tone makes you feel like you are underwater.

It is more than just optical illusions; it is inspired by mathematical pattern systems such as the Fibonacci sequence and Riemannian geometry.

The project, presented jointly with United Talent Agency and Joshua Liner Projects, Stark has created a whole universe of colors that has no clear narrative. It is a free flowing experience of color, light and sound.

But what do you think of such a sea of ​​colors and where does its meaning for the artist come from?

As Stark explains: “I am inspired by nature and its connection to the spiritual world. I love how designs in nature are based on math equations and fractals. Sacred geometry, evolution and plant growth are my inspirations. “

You can’t help but think of their connections to the harsh 1960s abstraction, be it Frank Stella or Bridget Riley. Or the trippy patterned works of art by Alex Gray.

As Stark explains, “My love for colors comes from being used in nature. It’s usually a lure or repellent: a bright red fruit begging to be eaten, or a dangerous colorful poison dart frog warning you not to eat it. I am very interested in this dichotomy. Color is supposed to grab your attention and I love to play with these ideas in my work. “

Cascade is located at the William Vale Hotel in Williamsburg, Brooklyn (111 N 12th St). buy tickets here.

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Mid-Michigan entertainment weekend, September 24-26 and beyond – The Morning Sun https://evasonphuket.com/mid-michigan-entertainment-weekend-september-24-26-and-beyond-the-morning-sun/ https://evasonphuket.com/mid-michigan-entertainment-weekend-september-24-26-and-beyond-the-morning-sun/#respond Wed, 22 Sep 2021 05:01:09 +0000 https://evasonphuket.com/mid-michigan-entertainment-weekend-september-24-26-and-beyond-the-morning-sun/ Arts Courses: Fundamentals of colored pencils for teenagers aged 12-17, Saturdays, Sept. 25th-Nov. 6 ($ 140); Watercolor Workshop, 4 p.m., Sept. 25 ($ 55), Art Reach of Mid Michigan, 111 E. Broadway St., Mt. Pleasant, artreachcenter.org, 989-773-3689. Rare images from the Tuskegee Institute: early 20th century images at grpmcollections.org/Detail/collections/335. Also historical pictures of Lincoln, lumberjacks, […]]]>

Arts

Courses: Fundamentals of colored pencils for teenagers aged 12-17, Saturdays, Sept. 25th-Nov. 6 ($ 140); Watercolor Workshop, 4 p.m., Sept. 25 ($ 55), Art Reach of Mid Michigan, 111 E. Broadway St., Mt. Pleasant, artreachcenter.org, 989-773-3689.

Rare images from the Tuskegee Institute: early 20th century images at grpmcollections.org/Detail/collections/335. Also historical pictures of Lincoln, lumberjacks, WW1, others.

“Windows GR”: Art exhibition at The Grand Rapids Public Museum, 272 Pearl St. NW, Grand Rapids, free with general admission (2-12 USD) and at grpm.org/exhibits/.

Wonderfully Done: The Artis Collection of African American Fine Art, Wednesdays through Fridays 12 p.m. to 5 p.m., Saginaw Art Museum, $ 7, $ 5 students / seniors, 1126 N. Michigan Ave., Saginaw, saginawartmuseum.org/exhibition/wonderfullymade, 989- 754-2491.

Beats

Pendulum Lounge: Thursdays 4.30pm-8pm in the Midland Center for the Arts, 1801 W. St. Andrews St., Midland, live music, cocktails, small plates, visual arts demonstrations, trivia, more, indoor / Outdoor, Midlandcenter. org / shows-tickets / pendel-lounge.

Books

Used book sales: 10 a.m. Sept. 30 – Oct. 2, Veterans Memorial Library, 301 S. University, Mt. Pleasant, friendsofvml@gmail.com, 989-773-3242.

family

Mt. Pleasant Discovery Museum: 10 am-6pm daily, $ 8, seniors, group, and military discounts, 5093 E. Remus Road, Mt. Pleasant; mpdiscoverymuseum.org, 989-317-3221.

Homestead Farm: Farm-Related Activities of the 1870s, 1 pm-5pm, 400 S. Badour Road, Midland. Free, chippewanaturecenter.org.

Other

Mt. Pleasant Speedway: 7:45 p.m. September 24, gates open 5:00 p.m., 4658 E. River Road, Mt. Pleasant, 989-773-2387.

Museums

Bats-Masters of the Night: Grand Rapids Public Museum, 272 Pearl St. NW, Grand Rapids, included with museum admission ($ 13, $ 12 seniors, $ 8), grpm.org/bats, 616-929-1700.

POPnology: Pop Culture and Technology Exhibition, $ 13, $ 12 seniors, $ 8 children, Grand Rapids Public Museum, 272 Pearl St. NW, Grand Rapids, grpm.org.

recreation

Try Hockey: 12:30 pm – 1:30 pm September 26th, free for children, equipment and instructions available, ICE Arena, 5165 E. Remus Road, Mt. Pleasant, 989-400-1637, registration at fb.me/e / 1dBQYOY5w.

Bike tour: 6-8pm Sept. 27, Trail Ride starts from the CMU-RC area; Street group departs from Motorless Motion, 121 S. Main St., Mt. Pleasant; facebook.com/MidMidCycling.

Shopping

Farmers Market: Saturdays 9 am-2pm, Broadway Street, Downtown Mt. Pleasant, Thursdays 7:30 am-2pm, Island Park, 301 E. Andre St., Mt. Pleasant, facebook.com/mpfarmersmarket.

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Block party “A Farewell to Summer Tour” on Saturday in Ocean Gate https://evasonphuket.com/block-party-a-farewell-to-summer-tour-on-saturday-in-ocean-gate/ https://evasonphuket.com/block-party-a-farewell-to-summer-tour-on-saturday-in-ocean-gate/#respond Tue, 21 Sep 2021 10:00:08 +0000 https://evasonphuket.com/block-party-a-farewell-to-summer-tour-on-saturday-in-ocean-gate/ Hold on to that summer feeling for as long as possible! Whether you go for a walk on the promenade or the beach, enjoy good food outdoors or attend music concerts in a wide variety of venues. But next Saturday, September 25th, make a stop at Ocean Gate to say goodbye to your summer. Listen […]]]>

Hold on to that summer feeling for as long as possible!

Whether you go for a walk on the promenade or the beach, enjoy good food outdoors or attend music concerts in a wide variety of venues.

But next Saturday, September 25th, make a stop at Ocean Gate to say goodbye to your summer.

Listen to Vin Ebenau on Townsquare Media Jersey Shore radio stations in the morning, email him news tips here and download our free app.

On Ocean Gate Avenue from 10:00 AM to 10:00 PM, the Ocean Gate Recreational Department sponsored “A Farewell to Summer Tour” will rock the district and bring you unforgettable summer memories for FREE.

The organizer of Saturday’s block party, Rich Bazzanella, who too Hot Rod Inkin in Ocean Gatesays the event will include all kinds of activities and LIVE music.

“We have 5 LIVE bands all day, I have a ‘Wolfman Jack’ impersonator, there will be a stage setup right in front of the Anchor Inn and then the block party will go all the way down from there to the Ocean Gate Yacht Club” Bazzanella told Townsquare Media News.

All kinds of vendors and tables will also be set up at the block party.

“We have hot dog trucks, we have barbecues, we have the Anchor Inn, Linda’s Pizzeria, and the Ocean Gate Market, everyone will have food,” said Bazzanella.

While you fill your plate with some great summer dishes, give a little scare as we get a taste of the fall season.

“The Ocean Gate Market also sponsors a scarecrow competition and the city is decorated with scarecrows,” said Bazzanella.

If you’d like to take part in this contest, you can do so in advance and go to the Ocean Gate Market to pick up a number, which in turn will submit your application and then start building your scariest scarecrow – or a friendly one.

The evaluation part of the scarecrow competition takes place at 12 noon.

However, there is LIVE music and bands to enjoy throughout the day.

“The bands are going to be Crash Gordon and Debra Dynamite, and yours are really playing some drums, we have the Razorbacks, Bullzeye, Hypertension in the evening and then we have Wilson finishing it,” said Bazzanella. “We will (also) have swing band competitions and line dance competitions.”

Other fun events in the block section include a hot rod setup and a corn hole tournament, the ladder of which also includes prizes.

You are also encouraged to bring your own garden chairs to the block party so you can sit and watch the bands.

“It’s a full day event and everything is looking good,” said Bazzanella. “We would like to thank Mayor Paul Kennedy for turning all of our ideas into green and implementing them.”

As summer turns into fall, Bazzanella wanted to put together another show and event for everyone to come out and enjoy.

“There are no festivals on Ocean Gate Avenue, and Main Street USA if anything, so we want to have a small city fair and festival that really makes the city stand out,” said Bazzanella. “The town really has a lot of history, it’s the oldest yacht club on Barnegat Bay and people should really see it, so this festival really brings out a lot of that.”

(Courtesy Photo: Rich Bazzanella)
(Courtesy Photo: Rich Bazzanella)

LOOK: Here are the 50 best beach towns in America

Every beach town has its advantages and disadvantages, which made us think about what makes a beach town the best to live in. To find out, Stacker consulted data from WalletHub, released June 17, 2020, comparing US beach towns. The ratings are based on six categories: affordability, weather, safety, economy, education and health, and quality of life. The towns had a population of 10,000 to 150,000, but at least one local beach had to be listed on TripAdvisor. Read the full methodology here. We have selected the top 50 from these rankings. Readers who live in California and Florida will not be surprised that many of the cities featured here are in either of these two states.

Read on to see if your favorite beach town made the cut.

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Garrett Martin offers a vision for Explore Licking County https://evasonphuket.com/garrett-martin-offers-a-vision-for-explore-licking-county/ https://evasonphuket.com/garrett-martin-offers-a-vision-for-explore-licking-county/#respond Mon, 20 Sep 2021 10:19:48 +0000 https://evasonphuket.com/garrett-martin-offers-a-vision-for-explore-licking-county/ NEWARK – He puts the “c” in creative. He’s Garrett Martin, the (what else?) Creative director of Explore Licking County. “I choose to focus my neurotic chaos of creativity on making my hometown more beautiful,” he said. “It’s an added bonus that I can help promote all other independent businesses by marketing tourism and attracting […]]]>

NEWARK – He puts the “c” in creative. He’s Garrett Martin, the (what else?) Creative director of Explore Licking County.

“I choose to focus my neurotic chaos of creativity on making my hometown more beautiful,” he said. “It’s an added bonus that I can help promote all other independent businesses by marketing tourism and attracting it to the region.”

“Any visual or branding thing goes through me,” he added. “In my three years at ELC, we’ve completely changed the way we market the county, advancing the needle of creative design while highlighting the best of Licking County.”

The now 36-year-old Martin was born in Reynoldsburg and moved to the “country” at the age of 11 or 12, as he put it (Honors).

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Fun for the weekend https://evasonphuket.com/fun-for-the-weekend/ https://evasonphuket.com/fun-for-the-weekend/#respond Sat, 18 Sep 2021 07:31:21 +0000 https://evasonphuket.com/fun-for-the-weekend/ Markets Shongweni Farmers and Crafts Market: (Today) A fun and safe family outing in the country from 6:30 a.m. to 12:30 p.m. with full Covid logs. Fresh products, handicrafts, ready meals, decorative items, furniture, pet products, outdoor items, children’s rooms and jewelry. Call 031 777 4686. Musgrave Market: (Today) Under the trees in Berea Park […]]]>

Markets

Shongweni Farmers and Crafts Market: (Today) A fun and safe family outing in the country from 6:30 a.m. to 12:30 p.m. with full Covid logs. Fresh products, handicrafts, ready meals, decorative items, furniture, pet products, outdoor items, children’s rooms and jewelry. Call 031 777 4686.

Musgrave Market: (Today) Under the trees in Berea Park for great food, good music and stalls selling arts and crafts, clothing, accessories, confectionery, baked goods, books, toys, plants, high quality second hand items and more. From 9 a.m. to 2 p.m.

Golden Hours Market: (tomorrow) At this relaxed family market in the Golden Hours School from 10 a.m. to 2 p.m., all Covid-19 logs are in place. Call Lyn on 083 262 3693.

uMhlanga farmers market: Autumn Drive, Prestondale, every Wednesday from 8 a.m. to 12 p.m. Call Ethel on 060 303 3957.

Ross Tapson, Grant Halliday, Neil Ford and Aaron Saunders in Southern Rock Classics at Tina this weekend.

Shows

Rhumbelow, Tinas: Present (today and tomorrow) Ross Tapson, Grant Halliday, Neil Ford and Aaron Saunders Southern rock classics. Today at 6.30 p.m., tomorrow at 2 p.m. Tickets R160. Call Roland on 082 499 8636 or email [email protected]

Rhumbelow, Durban: (today) Music bingo with Dave Monks. Music bingo works the same as a normal bingo evening, but instead of being called numbers, this is done with music. There are two bingo sessions in one night, each lasting 45 minutes. Game 1 is that 60s 70s & 80s and game 2 All hits. Tickets R160. Call Roland on 082 499 8636 or email [email protected]

Rhumbelow-Durban: (Morning) 60s party package Stars Dave Monks and Marion Loudon at 2pm. Tickets R160. Call Roland on 082 499 8636 or email [email protected]

Seabrookes Theater: (today and tomorrow) Wild journey into the world of learning disabilities with ADHD by Funnyman Aaron McIlroy. Ends tomorrow. Today at 7 p.m., tomorrow at 3 p.m. Tickets R160 to R180 from web tickets.

Rhumbelow, Nordland: (today) Barry Thomson & The Reals present Hot August night, a tribute to Neil Diamond’s music at 6pm. Tickets R160. Call Roland on 082 499 8636 or email [email protected]

Playhouse, drama: (today and tomorrow) Seven ways to say goodbye, choreographed by Lliane Loots with The Flatfoot Company, features eight dancers exploring human relationships during the self-isolation and social distancing of a global pandemic. Today at 2.30 p.m. and 6.30 p.m., tomorrow at 2.30 p.m. Tickets R70 from Webtickets.

Playhouse, opera: (Today and tomorrow) The awakening: rebirth is a contemporary dance collaboration with the Phakama Dance Theater (KZN) and Moving Into Dance (Gauteng). Today at 2.30 p.m. and 6.30 p.m., tomorrow at 2.30 p.m. Tickets R70 to R100 from web tickets.

Roy Couzens Theater, Westville: Westville Boys ‘High School and Westville Girls’ High School present Crazy carousel, an intimate evening with Jacques Brel. Directed by Steven Stead, musical direction by Roland Perold and choreography by Simone Mann. September 23rd to 26th at 7pm; on Sunday 6 p.m. Two tables for four and 21 tables for two. No single ticket bookings will be accepted. Tickets R120 from Webtickets.

comedy

Rooftop grill, Umhlanga: Jokers Corner Comedy Picnic with Simphiwe Shembe, known for his dance moves, and his fun friends have kept Durban and South Africans entertained. 26.09. at 13 o clock. Tickets R200 from Webtickets, R250 on the door.

The Midlands Trio is presenting a recital for oboe, bassoon and piano for Friends of Music tomorrow.

music

Westridge Tennis Stadium: (Today) March Into Spring Fest showcases a range of artists from a variety of genres, including Lungi K, Lisa B, Nqobile Gumede, Vista, GT Squared, EmKat, and DJ Catziko. Artists and artisans also sell their wares and food stalls. From noon. Tickets R100 from Webtickets, R120 at the gate.

uMhlathuze Sports Fields, Richards Bay: (today) uMhlathuze Soul & Jazz Experience shows Freddie Jackson singing his hits. He will share the stage with South African artists and international artist Howard Hewett. From 4 p.m. Tickets R200-R1 400 from Webtickets.

Jewish Center Durban: (tomorrow) Friends of Music present the Midlands Trio at 3 p.m.: Maggie Deppe (oboe) Charl van der Merwe (bassoon) and Ilse Myburgh (piano) in a varied program. Tickets R100 (members) R120 (non-members). Pre-registration absolutely necessary [email protected] or call 071 505 1021 (Keith) or 083 253 7935 (Bernitz).

St. Michaels at Sea: South Coast Soul Session for jazz and soul lovers to celebrate different cultures through the diverse sounds of old school music. September 24th from 10 a.m. Tickets R100 from Webtickets.

A picture from the Revelations photo exhibition at Durban Art Gallery.

Arts

KZNSA gallery: Recall, an exhibition by Clive van den Berg, who held his first solo exhibition in 1983 at the KZNSA gallery. At the time, much of Van den Berg’s work dealt with the violence of nationalism. For Van den Berg, returning to the place where his journey began, the subject continues to be a rich area of ​​interest. Until October 10th.

Elizabeth Gordon Gallery: (today) Lisa-Jane Hamlin is a Durban photographer known for her wonderful black and white pictures of our native trees. Call 031 303 8133.

The Green Gallery: (Today) Spring fever is everywhere with a new selection of floral paintings by artists Nicole Pletts, Janine Jollands, Val Wilson, Shirley Brandon and Nicky Firth. Flanders Boutique Mall, Flanders Drive, Mount Edgecombe. Call 031 502 2757.

Durban Art Gallery: An exhibition and community engagement series entitled Revelations This is a visual dialogue between two generations of South African documentary photographers Cedric Nunn and Samora Chapman. Their work reveals the daily struggles and triumphs of the people in the KZN. September 23 to November 10.

The gallery: (today and tomorrow) The studios in the Ballito Lifestyle Center have reopened. In collaboration with the African Arts Center, it brings a range of visual arts, introduces new artists and with well-known artists from the KZN and afar in an exciting new space. Call 072 245 8691.

Alliance Française: Childhood innocence is a solo exhibition by the self-taught Sibusiso Makhunga under the direction of the established Congolese artist Thonton Kabeya. From September 24th to October 16th, 11am to 6pm.

Outdoors

Amblers hiking club: (tomorrow) At 2 p.m. hike to the Roosfontein nature reserve. Meet at Westville Prison for an engaging hike. Call David on 072 615 0559.

Bicycle club: Meet at Mini Town’s North Beach parking lot at 9:00 a.m. every Tuesday for a bike ride on the boardwalk. Call Ian on 083 675 2125.

A scene from Les Diaboliques, the 1955 chiller shown this week at the Alliance Française Cineclub.

Events

Alliance Française: Cineclub on September 22nd Features Les Diaboliques (The Devils) a 1955 French psychological horror thriller by Henri-Georges Clouzot starring Simone Signoret, Véra Clouzot, Paul Meurisse and Charles Vanel. Demonstration at 6 p.m.

Umgeni steam train: KZN Classic Motorcycle Club members will travel on Sunday September 26th at 8:30 am on the 83 year old Umgeni Steam Railway train, which departs from Kloof and stops at Inchanga Station, to showcase their classic and vintage motorcycles. Umgeni Steam Railway is running again after a long pause. Departure from Kloof train station on Saturdays and Sundays at 8.30 a.m. and 12.30 p.m. R260 adult / R190 child and pensioner tickets must be pre-booked at www.umgenistamrailway.com.

The independent on Saturday

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How to Make the Most of Austin Museum Day 2021 https://evasonphuket.com/how-to-make-the-most-of-austin-museum-day-2021/ https://evasonphuket.com/how-to-make-the-most-of-austin-museum-day-2021/#respond Fri, 17 Sep 2021 16:38:04 +0000 https://evasonphuket.com/how-to-make-the-most-of-austin-museum-day-2021/ More than 25 local institutions offer free entry and activities on Sunday for the city’s 24th annual Austin Museum Day. Below are some of our favorites. CIRCUIT sculpture garden + museum UMLAUF presents extraordinary art in a relaxed atmosphere in a shady garden with native Texan plants and offers hourly guided tours with lecturers for […]]]>

More than 25 local institutions offer free entry and activities on Sunday for the city’s 24th annual Austin Museum Day. Below are some of our favorites.

CIRCUIT sculpture garden + museum

UMLAUF presents extraordinary art in a relaxed atmosphere in a shady garden with native Texan plants and offers hourly guided tours with lecturers for groups of 10 people, a pop-up market and a special installation for Austin Museum Day. Children can also use accessories to make coffee filters and take part in scavenger hunts. While the indoor gallery remains closed, visitors can register for their outdoor tour here. 605 Azie Morton Road, 11 am-4pm

Texas Music Museum

On Sunday, the Texas Music Museum will finally reopen its doors for tours of local music history, including the latest exhibition: Contributions from East Austin African Americans to Texas Music. Created from over 30 years of research into Austin’s African-American blues, ragtime, jazz, and gospel musicians, the exhibition features rare photographs, live music videos, and more. The museum asks visitors to call ahead and that groups stay under 10 people. 1009 E. 11th St., 1-4pm

Texas Memorial Museum

Have you ever experienced the awe of finding a fossil, perhaps in your garden or a nearby stream, and wanted to know what that creature looked like eons ago? The paleontologists at the Texas Memorial Museum invite admirers of prehistory to their Paleo Lab on Museum Day to identify free fossils. Pre-registration is required for fossil identification. 2400 Trinity Street, 1-5pm

Mexican Arte Museum

Kill Joy, an artist featured in the museum’s newly opened exhibit MX 21 resistance, confirmation & resilience, leads a printmaking workshop for visitors on museum day. Guided tours take place at 1:00 PM and 2:00 PM, and Mexic-Arte’s Changarrito artist, Luke Cisneros, will be on-site, exhibiting and selling his artwork. Kongressstrasse 419, 1 p.m. – 4 p.m.

Elisabeth Ney Museum

The Ney is handing out free art sets to families to honor their own woven slingshots. to tinker Newly woven: 2021, their outdoor and indoor installations created by local artist Jade Walker. Visitors should bring their own strips of fabric, ropes, yarn, or old linen and water ski ropes to contribute to the outdoor installation that encourages collective healing through weaving. Guided museum tours are also available, and an opportunity to explore the works, home, and studio of Elisabet Ney, the German sculptor who moved to Austin in 1892 to revive her artistic career. 304 E 44th St., 12 p.m. to 5 p.m.

Austin Nature and Science Center

Good news, dinosaur lovers: The Dino Pit at the ANSC is open! Special guests from MathHappens, PollenATX and Texas Master Naturalists will be on site for Museum Day, offering activities involving insects, bubbles, human sundials, Fibonacci and geocaching. At the trade counter, children can exchange the points they have collected for natural prizes. 2389 Stratford Drive, 9 am-1pm

The Beverly S. Sheffield Education Center

Enter the Barton Springs Bathhouse to see the exhibition Splash! Into the Edwards Aquifer, a simulated limestone cave exploring Austin’s most important natural resource. On Museum Day, anyone can sculpt their favorite Barton Springs creature, a salamander, and the center works with the Austin Nature & Science Center for additional educational programs. 2201 William Barton Road, 12 pm-5pm

The contemporary Austin

Both Contemporary Austin locations – Downtown Jones Center and Laguna Gloria – offer free entry and takeaway art sets for Museum Day. The DIY art sets were designed by the artists Masumi Kataoka and Calder Kamin, and are inspired by their works that were created in the Crit group meeting Exhibition showing the spectrum of Austin’s contemporary art. The Jones Center is also the current home of Daniel Johnston: I’m living my broken dreams, the first museum exhibition of the rich visual arts of the musician. Jones Center 700 Congress Avenue; Laguna Gloria 3809 W. 35th St., 12 p.m.-4 p.m.

Other participating locations are:

Asian-American Resource Center
8401 Cameron Road, 12 noon-3 p.m.

Blanton Museum of Art
200 E. MLK Jr. Blvd., 10 am-5pm

Briscoe Center for American History
2300 Red River St., Unit 2, noon-5 p.m.

Brush Square Museums
Virtual tour

Bullock Texas State History Museum
1800 Congress Avenue, 10 am-5pm

City of Austin Art in Public Places
Many locations, natural light recommended

Dougherty arts center
1110 Barton Springs Road, 11 am-1pm

Flower Hill Urban Homestead Museum
Virtual tour

Historic site of the French Legation State
802 San Marcos Str., 12 noon-3 p.m.

Lady Bird Johnson Wildflower Center
4801 La Crosse Ave., 9 am-5pm

Landmarks, The Public Art Program at the University of Texas at Austin
204 E. Dean Keeton St., daylight recommended

Neill Cochran House Museum
2310 San Gabriel St., 11 a.m. – 4 p.m.

Pioneer farms
10621 Pionierhöfe Dr., 10 a.m. to 5 p.m.

Austin’s Cemeteries and Oakwood Chapel
1601 Navasota St., 9 am-5pm

Texas Capitol Visitor Center
112 E. 11th St., 12 pm-5pm

Texas Military Forces Museum
3038 W. 35th St., 10 am-4pm

Texas Capitol
1100 Congress Avenue, 12 p.m. to 5 p.m.

Texas State Cemetery
909 Navasota St., 12 p.m. to 5 p.m.

The Williamson Museum
716 S. Austin Ave., Georgetown, 1-4pm

Women & their work
1311 E. Cesar Chavez, 12 p.m. – 6 p.m.

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Is the art world ready for radical action in the fight against climate change? https://evasonphuket.com/is-the-art-world-ready-for-radical-action-in-the-fight-against-climate-change/ https://evasonphuket.com/is-the-art-world-ready-for-radical-action-in-the-fight-against-climate-change/#respond Fri, 17 Sep 2021 04:00:59 +0000 https://evasonphuket.com/is-the-art-world-ready-for-radical-action-in-the-fight-against-climate-change/ Newsletter: FT weekend Get some weekend inspiration with the best of life, art and culture. Delivered every Saturday morning. At the FT Weekend Festival in early September, ten readers and subscribers came together to hear a panel of experts on the art world and climate change, specifically: Is the art industry ready, given the magnitude […]]]>

Newsletter: FT weekend

At the FT Weekend Festival in early September, ten readers and subscribers came together to hear a panel of experts on the art world and climate change, specifically: Is the art industry ready, given the magnitude of the environmental crisis the world is facing? change radically?

She has begun to understand her contribution to the problem, said Kate MacGarry, whose east London gallery represents artists such as Rana Begum, Rose Finn-Kelcey and Goshka Macuga. MacGarry is a co-founder of the Gallery Climate Coalition (GCC), which aims to create a greener and more sustainable art world; Her website has a carbon footprint calculator that is “tailored for a commercial gallery,” she said. “You can look at your flights, you can look at your building, you can look at your shipping.”

‘Here’s a Storm Warning’ (1971-2011) by Rose Finn-Kelcey © Courtesy Estate of Rose Finn-Kelcey and Kate MacGarry, London

MacGarry is setting a good example: she has published the latest carbon footprint of her gallery on the GCC website. In 2018-19 it was 24 tons, which is the equivalent of 40 round-trip flights between London Heathrow and New York JFK. In fact, 45 percent of her carbon footprint was from flights, including to art fairs, which gave her a clear signal on how best to reduce it.

She said she would “not throw the baby out with the bathwater” by giving up all international trade fairs immediately, but changed her approach: “I’m doing Frieze and Basel this year because I can take the train there. I no longer fly works internationally. . . I think we’re at a real turning point and I’d love to see a really big change in the way we do business. ”But she added that she wasn’t sure she wanted to do art fairs at all.

Fairs and biennials are among the largest carbon producers in the art world, as gallery owners, collectors and journalists jet from Sao Paulo to Shanghai via London. In 2000 there were 55 established international art fairs; In 2018 there were almost 300 according to the Art Basel / UBS art market report 2019. They are therefore a natural destination for the environmentally conscious.

Artists have long highlighted the human impact on the planet. Jane and Louise Wilson are the Turner Prize nominated sisters whose work has often addressed environmental issues. Recalling a project they did in 2010-11 when they were invited to work in Chernobyl by the British Council in Kiev 25 years after the nuclear disaster, Louise Wilson took large pictures of abandoned city buildings like schools and the swimming pool.

In an abandoned building, unevenly gray pieces of wooden floor are piled up in front of a rusty door

“Atomic Grade VIII (Nature Abhors A Vacuum)” (2010) by Jane and Louise Wilson

Shelves are tipped over in an abandoned office

‘Atomgrad II (Nature Abhors A Vacuum)’ (2010) by Jane and Louise Wilson © Courtesy of the artists (2)

“What fascinated us,” she said, “was to see how much nature has reclaimed itself in the 25 years since the apparent meltdown. . . There is something really interesting about these lessons, which can be drawn from nature’s regenerative potential, especially in the climate crisis we are currently facing. “

But they also witnessed the effects of our more disturbed weather systems first hand, said Jane Wilson: Parts of Düsseldorf, where they work with a photo studio, were inundated by floods in the summer.

The art world plays an important role in helping the environment, said James Thornton, founding chief of Client Earth. Client Earth is an environmental organization that uses the law to prevent governments from ignoring their climate change commitments; It has stopped the construction of around 50 coal-fired power plants and has held the UK government accountable for air quality measures.

“The world of fine arts and the world of musical art. . . have tremendous cultural influence, ”said Thornton. “People really care. . . And if you decide, ‘We’ll do it like this,’ people will follow. By taking this action now, you will be ahead of many industries. “

Five people sit on chairs on a stage

The FT Weekend Festival panel (from left): Jane and Louise Wilson, Josh Spero, Kate MacGarry, James Thornton

Louise Wilson said that changes could come from staging exhibitions – for example, you could stop remodeling the interior of a gallery for each new exhibition. “The changes don’t have to be so drastic, but they could be dramatic.” Similarly, Jane Wilson suggested local manufacturing – doing the work where it is shown – or at least using ocean shipping instead of air freight.

Art often goes on a world tour. Sotheby’s recently announced that highlights of the Macklowe collection sold will travel from New York to Taipei, Hong Kong, London, Los Angeles and Paris. But Client Earth, which works with Christie’s, is going a different way.

Christie’s runs a series of auctions where an artist has donated a work that will be sold and the proceeds will go to Client Earth; it begins with “There’ll be bluebirds” (2019) by Cecily Brown in London on October 15, and other pieces were donated by Antony Gormley and Beatriz Milhazes. As Thornton pointed out, Brown’s work “will stay in London, even though people from all over the world will bid on it,” and so will all other artists.

An abstract painting with many light, thin, overlapping brushstrokes on a greenish background

‘There’ll be bluebirds’ (2019) by Cecily Brown © Cecily Brown. Courtesy of the artist and the Thomas Dane Gallery

Doing business online – whether it’s advertising or selling or meeting – instead of traveling is now fully part of the art world, especially thanks to the past 18 months, he said, “This is a silver lining for the Covid cloud as we” We have we are all used to doing business over the web and maintaining relationships that we have already established over the web. “

Artists will still want to travel wisely, said Jane Wilson, who spent a long time researching and art in Japan, the South China Sea, and elsewhere. “You have to accept that artists should still be allowed to lead and still not feel inhibited about certain things. [On research trips] You really focus on doing your job and expanding your insights and knowledge. “

But does the art world really want to change in the end and give up its glamorous (exhausting, polluting) lifestyle? Kate MacGarry was optimistic but pragmatic: the art world needed help with logistics like shipping, insurance and the like, but “I think the need is there. We don’t all live under a rock. We can see what’s going on on the news. We can see what’s going on around the world. “

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Meet the Street Festival begins in Red Deer – Red Deer Advocate https://evasonphuket.com/meet-the-street-festival-begins-in-red-deer-red-deer-advocate/ https://evasonphuket.com/meet-the-street-festival-begins-in-red-deer-red-deer-advocate/#respond Fri, 03 Sep 2021 23:45:00 +0000 https://evasonphuket.com/meet-the-street-festival-begins-in-red-deer-red-deer-advocate/ The last mural in downtown Red Deer was unveiled when the city opened the Meet the Street Festival. Bruno Canadien, a visual artist from Black Diamond, was on hand to unveil his artwork, which features three large square flower paintings. “Much of my work recently has been based on Dene floral designs, which are traditionally […]]]>

The last mural in downtown Red Deer was unveiled when the city opened the Meet the Street Festival.

Bruno Canadien, a visual artist from Black Diamond, was on hand to unveil his artwork, which features three large square flower paintings.

“Much of my work recently has been based on Dene floral designs, which are traditionally done in beadwork and embroidery,” said Canadien, a member of the Deh Gah Got’ı́é Kǫ́ę́ First Nation, a member of the Deh Cho region of the Dene Nation.

“This is the family work that has been done and continues to do. I only keep track of this Dene work of art through painting. … I hope to continue this tradition and participate in the Dene art genre. “

Canadien, who holds a degree in fine arts and painting from the Alberta College of Art, responded to the call for artists published by the city earlier this year.

“I wanted to try my hand at public art and thought this would be a great opportunity to do so. Fortunately I was accepted, ”he said, adding that it took 10 days to complete the three paintings.

City of Red Deer community development director Bobby-Jo Stannard praised Canadien and the 12 other artists whose murals helped beautify downtown.

“The murals are amazing,” said Stannard.

“It was such a rich addition to our inner city to have painted these murals.”

The Meet the Street Festival began on Friday and will last through Sunday in downtown Red Deer, Ross Street Patio, First Red Deer Place Parking Lot, and Gary W. Harris Celebration Plaza. The event features live entertainment, a street art fair, bizarre bazaar craft market, community pop-up activities, and more.

“We are very excited to invite Red Deerians to return downtown to visit the improvements that have taken place during the pandemic. We are running this festival to celebrate art and culture in a safe and socially distant way, ”said Stannard.

The opening event officially begins with the Alberta Culture Days, which take place throughout September.

For more information and a schedule of activities, visit www.reddeer.ca/meetthestreet.


sean.mcintosh@reddeeradvocate.com
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