Thai Lending – Evason Phuket http://evasonphuket.com/ Tue, 27 Sep 2022 15:21:09 +0000 en-US hourly 1 https://wordpress.org/?v=5.9.3 https://evasonphuket.com/wp-content/uploads/2021/06/icon.png Thai Lending – Evason Phuket http://evasonphuket.com/ 32 32 Color Field Painting: The Rediscovery of Sherron Francis https://evasonphuket.com/color-field-painting-the-rediscovery-of-sherron-francis/ Tue, 27 Sep 2022 14:26:18 +0000 https://evasonphuket.com/color-field-painting-the-rediscovery-of-sherron-francis/ “Sherron Francis: A Retrospective”, installation view. (Courtesy of Lincoln Glenn). The world of fine art can be cutthroat – especially for the artists who make it possible. Supermodel Heidi Klum says it about fashion, but it also applies to fine art: “One day you’re in, the next day you’re out.” For color field painter Sherron […]]]>

“Sherron Francis: A Retrospective”, installation view. (Courtesy of Lincoln Glenn).

The world of fine art can be cutthroat – especially for the artists who make it possible. Supermodel Heidi Klum says it about fashion, but it also applies to fine art: “One day you’re in, the next day you’re out.” For color field painter Sherron Francis, that was at least partially the case.

Francis ran with the abstract art heavyweights of the 1970s and endeared himself to second-generation abstract expressionists such as Dan Christensen and Larry Poons. Her work has been exhibited by André Emmerich and Tibor de Nagy, and her paintings have been included in notable collections of artist Helen Frankenthaler and critic Clement Greenberg. Press praised her ethereal abstractions, which retain a special soulful essence through their abandonment of form. Gradually, however, galleries began to ditch artists who didn’t quite qualify as blue chip, avant-garde art dominated the headlines, and Francis was under pressure to adapt to new styles or aggressively market their work to new gallery owners. Instead, she simply retired from the game, leaving Manhattan and retiring to a remote corner of Long Island, where she spent her summers. As a result, many of her artist friends lost touch, and her work — absent from art history textbooks — became a phantom presence.

Presented by Lincoln Glenn Gallery, “Sherron Francis: A Retrospective” marks a new chapter in the artist’s career. A reintroduction to Francis’ work, the exhibition presents 22 paintings created between the 1970s and 1980s, at the height of her career. This is the artist’s first solo show in almost 40 years and is exemplary of the gallery’s programming.


WHAT: Sherron Francis: A Retrospective

WHEN: September 10 – October 23, 2022

WHERE: LINCOLN GLENN, 126 Larchmont Avenue, Larchmont, New York 10538, gallery@lincolnglenn.com


Sherron Francis, Coosa, 1972. Acrylic on canvas, 65 1/2 x 44 1/2 in. (Photo: Clanci Jo Conover).

Lincoln Glenn, led by Douglas Gold and Eli Sterngass, experts in the field of American art, opened their doors in Larchmont, NY earlier this year. The gallery’s listing focuses on American art from the 19th century to the present, with a particular emphasis on reviving and exploring “the careers of artists who worked between the 1950s and 1970s who made significant contributions to art history, but whose names may be.” have been forgotten by time.” Francis is the perfect example of an artist who received critical acclaim at the height of her career but fell out of public view, making her an ideal candidate for representation at Lincoln Glenn. Many important abstractionists are finally receiving the attention they deserve for their place in art history (like Lynne Drexler and Elaine de Kooning), and Sherron Francis should be no exception.

Francis is a unique artist indeed – in the late 1970’s and 1980’s she supplemented her income as an artist by running her own commercial fishing boat. This endeavor freed her from relying on the sale of artworks as her sole source of income, and she was able to set her own hours, be her own boss, and shed the rigidity that comes with working for someone else. While many artists feel intensely strained to create specific styles so they can make sales, which can lead to a style drawer, this has never been an issue for Francis.

“Sherron Francis: Installation View. (Courtesy of Lincoln Glenn).

Although initially drawn to figurative painting, Francis loved abstraction and sought to expand its intrinsic possibilities. She first ventured into the world of abstraction because it was expensive to find models for her; She saw abstraction in many different forms on the New York art scene and inspired them to abandon figuration. Her preferred medium was water-based paint applied to unstretched canvas – she spread out a large canvas on the floor and used squeegees of different sizes to move the paint across the surface. Her goal was to “draw with color” and allow movement to guide the composition. The result was soothing, celestial forms that avoid being derivative of earlier abstractionists and embrace an individual style that is inherent in Francis’ work. “cosa‘, 1972, is one of those early abstractions whose lavender tones exude an air of calm. Her first solo exhibition was at André Emmerich’s in 1973, and she was featured at the Whitney Biennial that same year.

In the late 1970s, Francis began incorporating commercial insulating gravel into her paintings, mixing pieces with paint and applying them to a canvas. This effect created a crusty look and texture, adding an element of depth and tactility to her work. “Red tip“, 1979, shows how the gravel combines with the pigment to create a three-dimensionality and literally takes the paint off the canvas.

Sherron Francis, Red Peak, 1979. Acrylic and mixed media on canvas, 37 x 28 inches. (Photo: Clanci Jo Conover).

Francis was an art teacher at Ridgewood School of Art and Design and Cooper Union until 1985 and continued to exhibit her work through the ’80s and ’90s. When the artist loft she had lived in for decades, which served as a meeting place for her colleagues, was sold to New York University around the turn of the century, she took this as a sign that her time in the New York art world had come to an end. She moved permanently to her North Fork, Long Island retreat and opened an antique shop called Small Holdings Farm, which is still in operation today. Sherron Francis is someone who follows her passions and lets her heart dictate how she spends her time. Whether that means spending an afternoon fishing, experimenting with new artistic techniques, or browsing through antique wares, she’s bound to pursue something that interests her.

Clanci Jo Conover

Clanci Jo Conover is a multifaceted artist and independent curator. She has curated exhibitions in New York at Sotheby’s Institute of Art, the AADLA Fine Art & Antiques Show and various Upper East Side art galleries. Since earning her Master’s degree in Art Business, she has worked as a gallery director and program manager for travel agencies, as well as a freelance writer and photographer. She has published articles in Fine Art Globe, The Cupola (scholarly journal), Voyages and Her Campus; and had photographs published in The New York Times, American Fine Art Collector, Apollo, American Art Collector, and NewTown Bee.

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The Art Angle Podcast: How the Universe Taught Wolfgang Tillmans to Make Art https://evasonphuket.com/the-art-angle-podcast-how-the-universe-taught-wolfgang-tillmans-to-make-art/ Fri, 23 Sep 2022 10:30:32 +0000 https://evasonphuket.com/the-art-angle-podcast-how-the-universe-taught-wolfgang-tillmans-to-make-art/ Welcome to Art Angle, an Artnet News podcast that delves into the places where the art world meets the real world and brings down to earth the biggest story of each week. Join us each week for an in-depth look at what matters most in museums, the art market and more, with contributions from our […]]]>

Welcome to Art Angle, an Artnet News podcast that delves into the places where the art world meets the real world and brings down to earth the biggest story of each week. Join us each week for an in-depth look at what matters most in museums, the art market and more, with contributions from our own writers and editors, as well as from artists, curators and other top experts in the field.

When visitors see the new Wolfgang Tillmans retrospective at the Museum of Modern Art, the first thing they will probably notice is that only a few paintings are presented in a frame. Most are instead stapled or glued directly to the wall; Adorning almost every service in the six-story museum, they are arranged in groups rather than in rows, much like constellations in the night sky. And that’s an analogy the 54-year-old artist might appreciate himself, given his abiding love of space. “Astronomy,” he once said, “was my visual introduction to seeing.”

A cosmological awe permeates “To Look Without fear,” as MoMA’s exhibition is called—though Tillmans’ themes are often quite mundane. More than 300 photographs of the artist are included, spanning his career spanning nearly four decades, from his experimentation with a photocopier as a student in Germany in the late 1980s and his editorial efforts for index and I WOULD magazines in London and New York in the 90s to his darkroom abstractions of the early 2000s and beyond.

But Tillmans’ practice has always resisted strict taxonomization, and that’s true here, too; what can be seen is not a series of individual works, but a kind of diary journey through the life of the artist: his friends, his lovers; his work, his play; his experience of losing and living with HIV and his constant reflection on what it means to interpret it all through the technology of photography. No lens-based artist revels in the simple depths of the medium quite like him.

From now until January 1st next year, To look without fear an expansive, year-long presentation that rightfully places Tillmans as one of today’s most important working artists. Prior to the show’s opening, Artnet News’ Taylor Dafoe met with Tillmans at MoMA for a conversation about language, a look into the past, and how staring out into the cosmos has taught him to appreciate life on earth.

Wolfgang Tillmans: To look without fear is on view at the Museum of Modern Art until January 1, 2023.

Listen to more episodes:

The Art Angle Podcast: Rick Lowe on how art can solve real-world problems

The Art Angle Podcast: How K-Pop and Connoisseurship Made Seoul a New Art Capital

The Art Angle Podcast: How the art world is fighting back in Ukraine’s besieged capital [Re-Air]

The Art Angle Podcast: How Virgil Abloh changed the contemporary art world

The Art Angle Podcast: What is the Metaverse? And why should the art world care?

The Art Angle Podcast: Why artist Jayson Musson is fooling a humorless art world

The Art Angle Podcast: What Does the Future of NFTs Look Like Now?

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Art Exhibitions | Visual arts https://evasonphuket.com/art-exhibitions-visual-arts/ Tue, 20 Sep 2022 05:00:00 +0000 https://evasonphuket.com/art-exhibitions-visual-arts/ “Unstructured Advancement” – through September 23, Frederick Arts Council Arts Center, 5 E. Second St., Frederick. Features a variety of materials, including textiles and cast iron, highlighting Alyssa Imes’ approach to creating a multimedia experience for viewers of her work. Alyssa grew up in Emmitsburg and now lives in DC. The opening hours of the […]]]>

“Unstructured Advancement” – through September 23, Frederick Arts Council Arts Center, 5 E. Second St., Frederick. Features a variety of materials, including textiles and cast iron, highlighting Alyssa Imes’ approach to creating a multimedia experience for viewers of her work. Alyssa grew up in Emmitsburg and now lives in DC. The opening hours of the gallery are Monday to Thursday from 10 a.m. to 5 p.m., Friday from 11 a.m. to 4 p.m., Saturday and Sunday from 11 a.m. to 5 p.m. 301-662-4190 or frederickartscouncil.org.

“Infinite Growth: An Exhibition by LBGTQ+ Artists” – through September 23, FAC Art Center, 5 E. Second St., Frederick. Artists from Frederick, Baltimore and DC 10am to 5pm Monday to Thursday, 11am to 4pm Friday, 11am to 5pm Saturday and Sunday. frederickartscouncil.org.

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Legendary French new wave director Jean-Luc Godard has died at the age of 91 https://evasonphuket.com/legendary-french-new-wave-director-jean-luc-godard-has-died-at-the-age-of-91/ Tue, 13 Sep 2022 14:25:00 +0000 https://evasonphuket.com/legendary-french-new-wave-director-jean-luc-godard-has-died-at-the-age-of-91/ Jean-Luc Godard, the iconic “enfant terrible” of the French New Wave, who revolutionized popular cinema in 1960 with his first feature film “Breathless” and for many years was one of the most important directors of world cinema, has died. He was 91. The Swiss news agency ATS quoted Godard’s partner Anne-Marie Mieville and her producers […]]]>

Jean-Luc Godard, the iconic “enfant terrible” of the French New Wave, who revolutionized popular cinema in 1960 with his first feature film “Breathless” and for many years was one of the most important directors of world cinema, has died. He was 91.

The Swiss news agency ATS quoted Godard’s partner Anne-Marie Mieville and her producers as saying that he died peacefully and surrounded by his loved ones on Tuesday at his home in the Swiss town of Rolle on Lake Geneva.

French President Emmanuel Macron hailed Godard as “the most iconoclastic of all new wave directors” who “invented a resolutely modern, utterly free art form.”

He added: “We have lost a national treasure, the eye of a genius.”

Godard defied convention throughout a long career that began as a film critic in the 1950s. He rewrote the rules of camera, sound and narration.

He has worked with some of the best-known actors in French cinema, including Jean-Paul Belmondo, who became a star of Godard films, and Brigitte Bardot, who starred in his acclaimed 1963 work Contempt.

Referring to Godard’s groundbreaking first feature film, Bardot, 87, paid tribute to his genius on Twitter: “And it was breathless that he would join the firmament of the last great star creators.”

He portrayed the early Rolling Stones, gave a voice to the Marxist, leftist and Black Power politics of the 1960s, and his controversial modern day nativity play Hail Mary made headlines when Pope John Paul II denounced it in 1985.

While many of his works were praised, Godard also directed a number of films that were politically charged and experimental, delighting few outside a small circle of fans while frustrating many critics, who saw them as grossly over-the-top intellectualism.

Cannes Film Festival director Thierry Fremaux told The Associated Press on Tuesday that he was “sad, sad. Immensely so” at the news of Godard’s death.

Born on December 3, 1930 in Paris into a wealthy Franco-Swiss family, Godard grew up in Nyon, Switzerland and studied ethnology at the Sorbonne in France’s capital, where he was increasingly drawn to the cultural scene of the Latin Quarter. Cine Club” after the Second World War.

He befriended the later great directors Francois Truffaut, Jacques Rivette and Eric Rohmer and founded the short-lived Gazette du Cinema in 1950. In 1952 he began writing for the renowned film magazine Cahiers du Cinema.

After working on two Rivette and Rohmer films in 1951, Godard attempted to direct his first film while touring with his father across North and South America, but never finished it.

Back in Europe, he took a job as a construction worker on a dam project in Switzerland. With the fee he financed his first full film, “Operation Concrete” from 1954, a 20-minute documentary about the dam construction.

After returning to Paris, Godard worked as a spokesman for an artists’ agency and in 1957 made his first feature film – All Boys Are Called Patrick, which was released in 1959 – and continued to hone his writing.

He also began work on Breathless, based on a story by Truffaut. It was to be Godard’s first major success when it was released in March 1960.

In the film, Belmondo plays a penniless young thief who takes his cues from Hollywood movie gangsters and, after shooting dead a police officer, flees to Italy with his American girlfriend, played by Jean Seberg.

Imbued with the somber, brash tones of a resurgent post-war France – known domestically as the ‘Glorious 30’ years up until the late 1970s – his cinematic creations provided some of the most poignant imagery and lines from a then-rich, avant-garde Heyday of French filmmaking.

The images in Breathless of a naïve Seberg traipsing the Parisian Champs-Elysees to peddle New York Herald Tribune newspapers in a tight T-shirt, and close-ups of Belmondo smoking a cigarette and wearing a fedora wearing methodically rubbing his thumb, thoughtfully over his lips, could be anchored among the most memorable images of French cinema.

Together with Truffaut’s “The 400 Beats” from 1959, Godard’s film set new accents in French film aesthetics. Godard rejected the conventional storytelling style, instead using frequent jump cuts that mixed philosophical discussions with action scenes.

He spiced it all up with references to Hollywood gangster films and allusions to literature and the visual arts.

Godard also embarked on a career-long involvement in collective film projects, contributing scenes to The Seven Deadly Sins alongside directors such as Claude Chabrol and Roger Vadim. He also worked with Ugo Gregoretti, Pier Paolo Pasolini and Roberto Rossellini on the Italian film Let’s Have a Brainwash, in which Godard’s scenes portray a disturbing post-apocalypse world.

Godard, who would later become known for his uncompromising left-wing political views, had his first run-in with French authorities in 1960 while filming The Little Soldier. Full of references to France’s colonial war in Algeria, the film was only released in 1963, a year after the end of the conflict.

In the late 1960s his work became more political. In Weekend, his characters satirize the hypocrisy of bourgeois society while demonstrating the comic futility of violent class struggle. It was released a year before general anger at the establishment swept France, culminating in the iconic but short-lived student riots of May 1968.

Godard harbored a lifelong sympathy for various forms of socialism portrayed in films from the early 1970s through the 1990s.

Some of the greatest directors in global cinema have counted Godard’s boundary-pushing work as an influence, including Quentin Tarantino, Bernardo Bertolucci, Brian De Palma and Jonathan Demme.

Godard has been making potshots in Hollywood over the years.

He stayed home in Switzerland instead of traveling to Hollywood to accept an honorary Oscar at a private ceremony in November 2010 alongside film historian and preservationist Kevin Brownlow, director and producer Francis Ford Coppola and actor Eli Wallach.

His lifelong commitment to the Palestinian cause also earned him repeated accusations of anti-Semitism, though he insisted he sympathized with the Jewish people and their plight in Nazi-occupied Europe.

Although the Academy received some complaints about Godard being selected for the award, Academy President Tom Sherak said the director was only recognized “for his contributions to film in the New Wave era.”

Godard married Danish-born model and actress Anna Karina in 1961. She appeared in a number of films he made throughout the remainder of the 1960s, all of which were considered New Wave landmarks. Notable among them were “My Life to Live,” “Alphaville,” and “Crazy Pete” — which also starred Belmondo and was reportedly filmed without a script. Godard and Karina divorced in 1965.

Godard married his second wife, Anne Wiazemsky, in 1967. He later began a relationship with Swiss filmmaker Anne-Marie Mieville. Godard divorced Wiazemsky in 1979 after moving with Mieville to the Swiss community of Rolle, where he lived with her for the rest of his life.

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Don’t miss Art On Paper, this season’s most anticipated New York art fair! https://evasonphuket.com/dont-miss-art-on-paper-this-seasons-most-anticipated-new-york-art-fair/ Fri, 02 Sep 2022 13:18:46 +0000 https://evasonphuket.com/dont-miss-art-on-paper-this-seasons-most-anticipated-new-york-art-fair/ Want to rub elbows with New York’s most stylish patrons of the arts – and find a new focal point for your living room in the process? Don’t skip art on paper, one of New York’s most anticipated annual art fairs and this month’s ultimate see-and-seen event for creatives and collectors. Seriously, does anything make […]]]>

Want to rub elbows with New York’s most stylish patrons of the arts – and find a new focal point for your living room in the process?

Don’t skip art on paper, one of New York’s most anticipated annual art fairs and this month’s ultimate see-and-seen event for creatives and collectors. Seriously, does anything make you feel more sophisticated than a day at an art fair?

art on paper takes over Manhattan’s Pier 36 September 8-11, showcasing cutting-edge and contemporary works that celebrate – what else? – paper as a timeless medium capable of transforming, inspiring and captivating in uniquely creative ways.

Visitors can browse pieces from 100 galleries including returning local favorites SEIZAN, Muriel Guepin Gallery, Tuleste Factory, The Tolman Collection of New York, Sugarlift, Walter Wickiser Gallery, Vietnamese Contemporary Fine Art, Heliotrope, Accola Griefen Fine Art and Aux Gallery. as well as other new and returning national and international exhibitors such as Electric Works, K. Imperial Fine Art, CK Contemporary, Sous Les Etoiles Gallery, Koplin Del Rio, Spanierman Modern, Richard Levy Gallery, Tulsete Factory, Beatriz Esguerra Art, Dublin’s Stoney Road Press, Beatriz Esguerra Art from Colombia, Chiefs and Spirits from the Netherlands and AC Contemporary Art from Argentina to name a few.

Guests can also enjoy innovative paper-based programs, including large-scale interactive installations and award-winning special projects that push the boundaries of visual and conceptual artwork. (Get your Instagram ready.)

Whether you’re a seasoned collector or a newcomer to the art market, you’re sure to take home a newfound appreciation for the power of paper – and likely a new favorite piece for your home.

Oh, and did we mention it’s only $25 for an all-day pass and $50 for the entire weekend? Secure your tickets HERE!

[Photos courtesy Art on Paper]

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A whirling dervish and a flamenco dancer meet in a unique multimedia dance performance at Peterborough’s Market Hall https://evasonphuket.com/a-whirling-dervish-and-a-flamenco-dancer-meet-in-a-unique-multimedia-dance-performance-at-peterboroughs-market-hall/ Mon, 29 Aug 2022 18:58:45 +0000 https://evasonphuket.com/a-whirling-dervish-and-a-flamenco-dancer-meet-in-a-unique-multimedia-dance-performance-at-peterboroughs-market-hall/ Mayez Rahman as the whirling dervish and Carolina Loyola-Garcia as the flamenco dancer in Digital Dervish and Flamenco Sonic, a multimedia dance performance presented by Public Energy Performing Arts on September 9th and 10th, 2022 at the Market Hall, Peterborough . Created by Hedy Hurban of UK artist company Firoza, the work combines original digital […]]]>
Mayez Rahman as the whirling dervish and Carolina Loyola-Garcia as the flamenco dancer in Digital Dervish and Flamenco Sonic, a multimedia dance performance presented by Public Energy Performing Arts on September 9th and 10th, 2022 at the Market Hall, Peterborough . Created by Hedy Hurban of UK artist company Firoza, the work combines original digital projections, live performance and wearable technology. Hurban’s partner Kaz Rahman, the visual artist and filmmaker who created the digital projections for the production, grew up in Peterborough. (Photo: Lloyd Russell)

A unique multimedia dance performance inspired by the 13th-century Sufi tradition of ‘whirling dervishes’ and the flamenco tradition of southern Spain – combined with a modern technological twist – comes to Market Hall on September 9th and 10th Performing Arts Center at Peterborough.

Presented by Public Energy Performing Arts as the first production of Season 29 and supported by the New Canadians Centre, Digital Dervish and Flamenco Sonic combines original digital projections, live performance and wearable technology in a work by Canadian Hedy Hurban, director of performing arts at British artist firm Firoza, which takes an avant-garde approach to contemporary Islamic art.

A local connection is made through visual artist Kaz Rahman, who is Firoza’s Artistic Director and Firoza’s filmmaker and production designer Digital Dervish and Flamenco Sonic. Rahman grew up in Peterborough before moving to the US and eventually settling in the UK with his partner Hurban. Along with visual effects by Barış Çelik, Rahman created the performance’s dynamic projections, which envelop the audience in a mesmerizing environment.

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Digital Dervish and Flamenco Sonic begins with a dervish, a member of the Sufi religious order of Islam known for the ‘sema’ tradition – a 13th-century ‘whirling’ dance and meditative ritual still practiced today by the Mevlevi Sufis in practiced in Turkey. The Dervish, performed by Mayez Rahman, awakens from a dream to the sounds of birds and nature and begins to meditate and perform his sema. He is engulfed in a storm of chaos as he spins wildly and then collapses where he rests again.

A flamenco dancer, performed by Carolina Loyola-Garcia, notices the dervish and begins to move in similar patterns, evoking her “duende” — a heightened state of emotion, expression, and authenticity that has been described as “a special state of the Flamenco grace”. – in an attempt to wake the Dervish. The two dancers exchange their sounds and movements until they intertwine in a culminating vortex that includes music, images and physical movement.

A modern technological twist on the production is the use of the ‘soundrop’, a small handheld device developed by Hurban – an electronic music composer, choreographer and costume designer – to track specific movements of a performer and feed those movements onto sounds and LEDs to map lighting. Attached to the wrist or ankle, the soundrop becomes an extension of the performer’s body.

VIDEO: Digital Dervish and Flamenco Sonic Trailer

performances of Digital Dervish and Flamenco Sonic will take place on Friday, September 9th at 7:30 p.m. and on Saturday, September 10th at 1:00 p.m. Each 30-minute performance is followed by a question-and-answer session with the performers on stage.

For those unable to attend, the performance will be livestreamed on September 10 and a replay will be available a week after the performance.

“But you won’t get the full effect of projections that immerse the dancers and their movements that affect the sound and lights via wearable technology,” says a Public Energy media release.

Tickets for the presence and live stream performances of Digital Dervish and Flamenco Sonic are “pick a price,” starting at $5, and are available in advance at tickets.markethall.org.

More information on Public Energy and Digital Dervish and Flamenco Sonicvisit publicenergy.ca

kawarthaNOW is proud to be a long-standing media sponsor of Public Energy Performing Arts.

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Swim from Cincinnati to Kentucky in the Great Ohio River Swim this weekend | Activities | cincinnati https://evasonphuket.com/swim-from-cincinnati-to-kentucky-in-the-great-ohio-river-swim-this-weekend-activities-cincinnati/ Fri, 26 Aug 2022 16:11:28 +0000 https://evasonphuket.com/swim-from-cincinnati-to-kentucky-in-the-great-ohio-river-swim-this-weekend-activities-cincinnati/ click to enlarge Photo: Provided by Adventure Crew Great swim in the Ohio River Hundreds of swimmers will head to the Ohio River this weekend during the open-water Bill Keating, Jr. Great Ohio River Swim. Officially named after Keating — one of the first people to register for the inaugural event in 2007, who later […]]]>
click to enlarge

Photo: Provided by Adventure Crew

Great swim in the Ohio River

Hundreds of swimmers will head to the Ohio River this weekend during the open-water Bill Keating, Jr. Great Ohio River Swim.

Officially named after Keating — one of the first people to register for the inaugural event in 2007, who later lost a battle with brain cancer — the event is a fundraiser for the local nonprofit Adventure Crew, which “connects urban youth with the great outdoors.”

Swimmers will depart from the public landing downtown and make their way across the river, which will be closed to traffic, to Kentucky and back — about a half mile.

There will also be ten “Double Dippers” who will swim 2.5 miles downstream and then the traditional 800 meters to Kentucky. The Double Dip event will also raise money for Adventure Crew’s swim training program, which gives urban youth access to swimming lessons.

During the event, the river will be closed to motorized traffic and security jet skis, kayaks and boats will be in the water with the swimmers to provide assistance if needed. Local first responders will also be at the river for assistance.

On-site registration begins August 28th at 7am with mandatory safety briefings at 8am. Tickets are $40 for adults, $35 for college students, and $25 for youth.

The swim will be rescheduled for September 11 if river conditions are unfavorable.

The swim begins at the downtown public landing pad. Visit greatohioriverswim.com for more information.

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Mobile Augmented Reality (MAR) Market 2021-2027 Detailed Analysis and Growth Strategies, Region-wise and Current Scenario Analysis https://evasonphuket.com/mobile-augmented-reality-mar-market-2021-2027-detailed-analysis-and-growth-strategies-region-wise-and-current-scenario-analysis/ Tue, 23 Aug 2022 17:23:15 +0000 https://evasonphuket.com/mobile-augmented-reality-mar-market-2021-2027-detailed-analysis-and-growth-strategies-region-wise-and-current-scenario-analysis/ The new research report on Mobile Augmented Reality (MAR) market offers a thorough analysis of this industry vertical. As per the report, Mobile Augmented Reality (MAR) market is predicted to acquire notable gains and record a significant growth during the estimated timeframe. The Mobile Augmented Reality (MAR) market report emphasizes on the […]]]>




The new research report on Mobile Augmented Reality (MAR) market offers a thorough analysis of this industry vertical. As per the report, Mobile Augmented Reality (MAR) market is predicted to acquire notable gains and record a significant growth during the estimated timeframe.

The Mobile Augmented Reality (MAR) market report emphasizes on the current industry trends and entails details about market size, revenue forecast, and sales volume over the study duration. In addition, the report provides data with regards to the market drivers that will positively influence the revenue graph, alongside the segmentations influencing the industry size.

The major takeaways from the Mobile Augmented Reality (MAR) market report with regards to the regional contribution:

  • The research report on the Mobile Augmented Reality (MAR) Market offers a comprehensive assessment of the geographical landscape of this business segment. According to the report, the industry is split into regions such as North America, Europe, Asia Pacific, South America, Middle East and Africa.
  • The report provides crucial data on the sales generated by each region and their respective market share.
  • The report also offers forecasts on the growth rate of each region during the study period and the returns achieved by each region by the end of the estimated time frame.

Request a sample copy of this report @ https://www.newsorigins.com/request-sample/51583

Significant features listed under Offering and Key Reports Highlights:

  • Detailed overview of Mobile Augmented Reality (MAR) market
  • Changing Mobile Augmented Reality (MAR) Market Dynamics in the industry
  • Detailed market segmentation by type, application, etc.
  • Historical, current and forecast market size in terms of volume and value
  • Current industry trends and developments
  • Competitive landscape of Mobile Augmented Reality (MAR) market
  • Strategies of key players and product offerings
  • Potential and niche segments/regions with promising growth.

Other Basics of Mobile Augmented Reality (MAR) Market Report Are Listed Below:

  • The report provides brief data on the Mobile Augmented Reality (MAR) market competitive landscape and includes companies such as Google Inc. Qualcomm Microsoft Corp. Infinity Augmented Reality Samsung Electonics Blippar.com Daqri LLC Wikitude Gmbh Metaio Gmbh Catchoom Technologies Ather Aurasma.
  • The report also summarizes the products manufactured by the market majors and the respective applications of the product.
  • Additionally, the research report provides key insights of the companies based on their market position and highlights the revenue generated by each company.
  • The industry share of each company has been mentioned in the report.
  • The company’s profitability ratio and pricing models are also listed in the report.
  • The product landscape of the Mobile Augmented Reality (MAR) market is divided into Monitor-Based, Video See-Through HMD and Head-Mounted Displays. The research report provides accurate industry share information according to the product fragments.
  • The research report helps in analyzing the sales generated by each product as well as the revenue generated during the projected time frame.
  • According to the report, the application landscape of Mobile Augmented Reality (MAR) market is segmented into Medical Application, Visual Arts & Gaming, Industrial Application, Military & Navigation, Other, By Region, North America, USA, Canada, Europe. Germany, France, Great Britain, Italy and Russi.
  • Revenue estimates for each application fragment are mentioned in the report.
  • The report also emphasizes the business-oriented characteristics including industry concentration rate and competitive ranking.
  • It provides insights into the marketing channels employed by well-known companies of the Mobile Augmented Reality (MAR) market.

TOC of Mobile Augmented Reality (MAR) Market Report Includes:

  • Industry overview of the Mobile Augmented Reality (MAR) market
  • Industry chain analysis
  • manufacturing technology
  • Analysis of the main manufacturers
  • Global Production, Revenue and Price Analysis by Regions, Manufacturers, Types and Applications
  • Capacity, Production, Revenue and Growth Rate of Mobile Augmented Reality (MAR) Market in Global and in Foremost Regions (2015-2019)
  • Consumption Volume, Consumption Value, Import, Export and Trade Price Study of Mobile Augmented Reality (MAR) Market by Regions
  • Gross and gross profit audit
  • Marketing dealer or distributor exam
  • Global Impact on the Mobile Augmented Reality (MAR) Industry
  • Trend analysis of development

Request a customization for this report @ https://www.newsorigins.com/request-for-customization/51583

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Top 20 women in AI https://evasonphuket.com/top-20-women-in-ai/ Fri, 19 Aug 2022 16:51:08 +0000 https://evasonphuket.com/top-20-women-in-ai/ At RE•WORK we are strong advocates of supporting women working towards the advancement of technology. We asked our community to nominate their top 20 AI women from Germany who are working at the forefront of AI development and deserve recognition for their achievements. We believe recognizing these women is key to representing diversity in AI […]]]>

At RE•WORK we are strong advocates of supporting women working towards the advancement of technology. We asked our community to nominate their top 20 AI women from Germany who are working at the forefront of AI development and deserve recognition for their achievements. We believe recognizing these women is key to representing diversity in AI and further promoting diversity in this space. You can read the full list here.

All of the women on this list are inspirational and deserve their recognition, so we are pleased to announce that ahead of the RE•WORK Berlin AI Summit on October 4th and 5th, we have confirmed that 8 of the top 20 are joining us become, to speak, on one of two tracks, deep learning and Enterprise AIto share their expertise and insights in AI.

Here they are:

Samantha Edds, Senior Data Scientist at YELP

Sam Edds is a passionate executive with a proven track record of using statistics and data modeling to help organizations generate insights and tell a story to grow their business. Her unique background, which includes corporations, start-ups and non-profits, has taught me the importance of supporting the people, products and places that make up a community. A statistician with roots in International Studies and Development, she strongly believes in harnessing the power of big data to improve everyone’s livelihood by making more informed, data-driven decisions. While there is more analytics around the world than ever before, something infinitely important to business success and one that she remains focused on is using big data to tell a story and a vision that everyone can grasp. She loves designing and building models to solve problems and thrives on using her analytics to create a story that all clients (data driven or not) can understand.

Rosona Eldred, Machine Learning Engineer at BASF

Rosona is currently working at BASF as a Machine Learning Engineer. Rosona is a data expert with 5 years of industry experience following an academic career in mathematics culminating in a Max Planck Research Fellowship. Excels in collaborative teams with proactive independent contributors. Having worked with all parts of the ML lifecycle from requirements analysis to production, she is particularly motivated by structural problem solving, converting business potential into business value, and effectively moving promising prototypes into production.

Dzhuliana Nikolova, co-founder and CTO at OneUpOneDown

Dzhuliana’s main focus and strengths are education and self-development, which is why she eventually became the co-founder and CTO at OneUpOneDown – a highly scalable AI mentor matching platform and framework that connects women worldwide with their perfect match. Dzhuliana will be presenting at our Deep Learning Summit.

Maria Monzon, Data Scientist and Computer Vision Researcher at BASF

Maria is a biomedical engineer with a strong focus on computer science and machine learning, having successfully completed a bachelor’s degree in telecommunications engineering. She has extensive knowledge in medical imaging and biosignal processing: MRI, EEG, ECG, segmentation, tracking, registration, classification, pre-processing and image analysis. Her key strengths in Artificial Intelligence include: Pattern Recognition (PR), Deep Learning (DL), Computer Vision (CV), Machine Learning (ML), Convolutional Neural Networks (CNN), Transfer Learning, Classification, Regression, Supervised Learning Object Detection . Maria will be presenting at our Enterprise AI Summit.

Deena Gergis, Lead Data Scientist at Bayer

Because Deena believes in the untapped potential in each of us, she develops AI products to automate intelligent processes and give people more space to realize their greatest potential. With every AI solution she uses, someone gets the opportunity to reach their true potential. Deena is Lead Data Scientist at Bayer. After her MSc in Life Science Informatics at the University of Bonn, Deena worked as a teaching and research assistant before joining Recogizer as a data scientist. Deena will be presenting at our Enterprise AI Summit.

dr Carmen Martinez, Conversational UX Experience at Flixbus

dr Carmen Martinez is a conversational analyst and communication ethnographer working in Conversational Artificial Intelligence at FlixBus. As an expert in human-to-human conversations, she contributes to an interdisciplinary team by automating customer service interactions, modeling both text- and speech-based human-machine conversations, and developing visual solutions for graphical and multimodal conversational agents. Carmen holds a PhD in Conversation Analysis and is the author of Conversar en español: un enfoque desde el Análisis de la Conversación, edited by Peter Lang Berlin.

Sarah Haq, Senior Machine Learning Engineer at Artsy

Sarah is Senior Machine Learning Engineer at Artsy, the world’s largest online art marketplace, and lectures at Karlsruhe University of Applied Sciences and Leuphana University. She has over ten years of experience working with data and building machine learning models for various startups, from lingerie companies to unicorns. She is currently shaping the personalization strategy at Artsy and building a recommendation engine to connect collectors with artworks they will love. The art market is an extremely complex industry with even more complex collectors. The recommendations have to be good enough to convince someone to make a massive financial investment, but how do we use machine learning algorithms to recreate the emotional connection a collector has when they add a piece to their collection? Sarah will be giving a presentation at our Enterprise AI Summit to answer this question.

Aleksandra Kovachev, Data Science Manager at Delivery Hero

Aleksandra received her Ph.D. in the area of ​​complex networks with the aim of knowledge extraction by combining multiple data sources and various algorithms. She is passionate about bioinformatics and improving health through food and nutrition data. She currently works as an ML engineer for the global grocery delivery service Delivery Hero. Aleksandra will give a presentation at our Deep Learning Summit and discuss about optimizing the dish catalogue: from unstructured data to the knowledge graph.

If you want to connect with and hear from these AI pioneers, they will all be speaking at the RE•WORK Berlin AI Summit. Join them and many other AI leaders on October 4th and 5th, 2022. Register your place here with discount code UNITEAI to the 20% sale.

One pass gives you access to BOTH tracks – the Deep Learning Summit and the Enterprise AI Summit.

We have exclusively for RE•WORK participants reduced Room Prices with the venue, H4 hotel Berlin Alexanderplatz to enjoy your stay at the event – Book your discounted room here!

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Interview with Kenny Schachter |Tokyo Art Beat https://evasonphuket.com/interview-with-kenny-schachter-%ef%bd%9ctokyo-art-beat/ Sat, 13 Aug 2022 08:18:43 +0000 https://evasonphuket.com/interview-with-kenny-schachter-%ef%bd%9ctokyo-art-beat/ Yayoi Shionoiri, an arts attorney, spoke to Kenny Schachter, an artist, curator, writer and NFT advocate, about the importance of NFTs in the ongoing evolution of the art world. American artist Kenny Schachter (1961-), currently based in New York, has been creating works of art, organizing exhibitions in museums and galleries and teaching at universities […]]]>

Yayoi Shionoiri, an arts attorney, spoke to Kenny Schachter, an artist, curator, writer and NFT advocate, about the importance of NFTs in the ongoing evolution of the art world.

American artist Kenny Schachter (1961-), currently based in New York, has been creating works of art, organizing exhibitions in museums and galleries and teaching at universities for more than 30 years. Art attorney Yayoi Shionoiri spoke to Kenny about the NFT boom and its impact on the art world. 【Tokyo Art Beat】


What is “NFTism”?

──Thank you for taking the time to talk to us. To dive right in, you’ve dubbed your artistic practice with NFTs “NFTism.” NFTism seems to be a substitute for many things. Of course it refers to the name of the token associated with your PFP project, CryptoMutts (*), but it also seems to represent a generosity of spirit and a form of contemporary digital conceptual art that is schismatically different from other forms. What do you intend to mean by the term NFTism?

It’s all of the above and more. To me, NFTism is simply the people involved in the community and the creative work that comes from the connections between them.

But let’s take a step back. Shortly after I got started in the art world in the 1990s, there was a deep recession in the United States and it was a terrible time to be trying to make a living. But it was precisely during this time that some of the most beautiful and valuable moments of my artistic career took place. I did these short-term exhibitions in various locations before the term “pop-up” even existed, featuring artists like Vito Acconci, Cecily Brown, Wade Guyton, and Andrea Zittel. It was just art for art’s sake. There was no market for these works, and we never dreamed of it.

So I filled a gap in New York by curating a whole series of exhibitions on my own initiative, at a time when there really was no other way for an artist to break into the art world.

──How does the digital come into this community?

There was a time in the contemporary art world when artists needed to send physical slides to art professionals. Then there was the advent of social media, which eliminated the need for that kind of physical back-and-forth. Social media allowed artists to blur geographic boundaries to communicate a visual image, and suddenly they had the ability to reach new audiences — whether they were based in Asia or Africa or anywhere else in the world. Many artists were discovered this way but still had to rely on an antiquated, conservative system to sell their art.

NFTs changed that part of the equation because they allowed artists to directly communicate and engage with an audience. And again, it’s not about the money — the average NFT sells for $15 or $25. Even as technology advances, I don’t think this form of direct communication between artist and audience will go away.

Going back to your original question, NFTism represents all creators gathered in this digital community, whether they are mathematicians, programmers, or filmmakers. It’s an ethos that encourages exchanges between people, with people helping each other in a way I haven’t seen since the early ’90s.

Kenny Schachter Photo by Yayoi Shionoiri

Crypto art and traditional art

──Do you think the crypto art community will ever make friends with the traditional art world?

Of course. It’s already happening! I mean, there are established artists like Bjarne Melgaard, Tom Sachs and Roe Ethridge – they all started exploring NFTs. They’re the exception for now, but they’re also an example of organic, incremental cross-pollination between worlds.

──Do you see resistance to NFTs in the traditional art world?

Yes. I think there was so much resistance because some parts of the art world have a zero-sum mentality. And other parts of the art world have jumped right in to capitalize, notably auction houses, which have become the main dealers for NFTs as galleries have remained hesitant.

──Are auction houses becoming a new form of gatekeepers in the crypto art and NFT art community? Is there a difference between the NFT platforms that curate the NFTs on their platform – or is it the same as Christie’s that sells NFTs?

I mean, look – they’re different. They have different business models. They have different constituencies. But to be included in an auction you have to have a market. To get accepted into an NFT platform like Nifty Gateway, you also need to have a market.

But for NFT art, I also believe it’s a matter of self-creation. The efforts of the individual artist are important. It’s a change from previous iterations of the art market because there are more opportunities to create yourself out of whole fabric than there used to be. Developers have decentralized ways to access and build their own audiences through social media platforms like YouTube, Instagram, TikTok, and Twitter.

Because of this, all traditional players in the art world – galleries, auction houses, art consultants – must be open-minded, flexible and adaptable.

──Many in the traditional art world do not see NFTs as art historically relevant. Are there any NFT projects that you think are art historically relevant?

I know brilliant artists who do incredible NFT work under $50 like Sarah Friend, a great artist from Berlin. She studied painting and then taught herself programming. She works on community-based projects focused on universal income and equal pay. She is also very environmentally conscious and mints her NFTs on more energy efficient blockchains.

Kevin Abosch is someone who has been involved with crypto for a long time – he’s really smart and I like him and his practice. Finally, Rhea Meyers examines NFTs as a medium, including considering how intelligent the “smart contracts” actually are. For someone like Meyers, the NFT is art.

The problem is that much of the hype surrounding the recent NFT boom and bust stems from the inflow of large amounts of capital to purchase digital images of penguins and cats, and it feels like the art world is being dumbed down. I always say I got into art to run away from the business, and then the art world got bigger than the business I ran away from.

──So how are we supposed to work our way through this noise to find effective art?

It’s like everything. You gotta put the work in. Anyone can do it just like me – watch, learn and get the job done. And for me it would be a cool legacy if I could help open doors for others by sharing my successes and failures to inspire and support people.

──You have become an influential voice supporting NFT artists. Is it important to you to have physical representations of your NFTs?

100%. Because I think art is visceral, and even digital art has a physicality. Nothing replaces the experience of seeing art – and when viewing digital art, looking at a giant video monitor is far better than experiencing it through a small phone screen.

In this new medium, it’s exciting to share NFTs with the traditional art world audience – whether through my physical exhibitions at Galerie Nagel Draxler, like “Metadada”, or through one of Japan’s first auction house-led NFT auctions. NFT in Contemporary Art History: A Curated Sale by Hiroki Yamamoto SBI Art Auction where I sold my Money Money Money video. None of these target groups are mutually exclusive for me.

Kenny Schachter Money Money Money 2021

CryptoMutt’s PFP project

──Let’s talk about your CryptoMutts PFP project. There are 10,000 randomly generated images of humans and humanoids, each with different characteristics, and when you ‘adopt’ a CryptoMutt, the owner gets access to an ‘Art Club’ you run, including direct communication with you via a very robust Discord channel .

I didn’t expect to sell even five of the CryptoMutts, but about 9,000 of them were sold in the first 90 minutes of listing. That could have been a coincidence, or it could have been because I was involved early on. A lot has been traded – since September 2021 worth over 800 ETH. Each CryptoMutt is not expensive, but I do receive a small royalty from secondary market trading.

Kenny Schachter’s Discord channel

But as David Bowie said in the late ’90s, the Internet has changed the relationship between artists and audiences – almost merging them. Sometimes when I’m in the Discord channel I get slammed by CryptoMutt owners who paid $80 for it and think they own my soul! I also get negative feedback from the traditional art world, so I guess it’s not that different – ​​it’s part of being in the public eye.

──How do you stay on course and keep going when you’re getting negative feedback?

I’m not going to lie – it gets very hurtful because I’m listening to criticism.

I don’t really know what’s next for the CryptoMutts. In fact, I don’t even know what I’ll be doing in six months. What I do know is that I created this CryptoMutts project – it’s become like a kid and a part of my life. So whatever I do, it will stay with me.

After creating CryptoMutts I keep trying to create more value for the community. I’ve done free airdrops from other NFTs, created the NFTism token, and given away over 300 t-shirts – sending them to members of the CryptoMutt community around the world. It was really nice to realize that there is a community that has come together from all over the world – connected through these digital NFTs.

NFT technology has enabled an easier and more tangible way to allow an audience to directly support artists who have a conceptual practice. To that end, CryptoMutt holders are involved with my career. You have a stake in my future as an artist.

──CryptoMutts is a collection of 10,000 randomly generated NFTs on the Ethereum blockchain. By “adopting” a CryptoMutt, buyers gain access to the first “NFT Art Club” run by Kenny Schachter and receive 100 $NFTism tokens for every CryptoMutt they mint. The $NFTism tokens can be exchanged or traded on Uniswap.

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