Thailand Part time jobs – Evason Phuket http://evasonphuket.com/ Sat, 25 Sep 2021 01:22:26 +0000 en-US hourly 1 https://wordpress.org/?v=5.8 https://evasonphuket.com/wp-content/uploads/2021/06/icon.png Thailand Part time jobs – Evason Phuket http://evasonphuket.com/ 32 32 “Everything has now exploded”: On the streets with Thailand’s protesters | Thailand https://evasonphuket.com/everything-has-now-exploded-on-the-streets-with-thailands-protesters-thailand/ https://evasonphuket.com/everything-has-now-exploded-on-the-streets-with-thailands-protesters-thailand/#respond Fri, 24 Sep 2021 20:33:00 +0000 https://evasonphuket.com/everything-has-now-exploded-on-the-streets-with-thailands-protesters-thailand/ E.Just days after finishing his online college courses, Chai * is preparing to join the protests in Bangkok. He uses a headscarf to cover his face, material to cover his motorcycle license plate, a helmet and often a table tennis bomb. The self-made device, in which stones are wrapped in fireworks powder, is either thrown […]]]>

E.Just days after finishing his online college courses, Chai * is preparing to join the protests in Bangkok. He uses a headscarf to cover his face, material to cover his motorcycle license plate, a helmet and often a table tennis bomb.

The self-made device, in which stones are wrapped in fireworks powder, is either thrown at the police as a provocation or used as a distraction when he and his friends are followed by officers.

“We have no choice, we have to get out; my family is suffering, ”says 19-year-old Chai. As he speaks, the crack of fireworks and table tennis bombs echoes from a nearby underpass. Further along the roadside, clouds of black smoke rise from burning tires.

Riot police gather for an anti-government rally at Din Daeng Junction in Bangkok, Thailand. Photo: Anadolu Agency / Getty Images

It is located at Din Daeng intersection, the site of a leaderless teenage uprising that is calling for a range of issues ranging from democratic reforms to the coronavirus. For more than a month, the area has been transformed into a battlefield, with nightly clashes between young protesters, mostly students from vocational schools and poor neighborhoods, and the police, who routinely fire rubber bullets and tear gas.

Chai’s mother and father, a grocer and an electrician, respectively, have both lost their jobs due to the pandemic. Chai says he was also forced to quit his part-time job because his college course was rescheduled online and now ends later in the day. He is training to be an electrician, but is about to drop out. One of his friends who leans against him has already done so. You are having difficulty studying from home and you say there was no support to cover internet costs.

“Everything has peaked, everything is now exploding during Covid,” says Chai. The economic situation and the administration of public funds by the state can no longer be tolerated.

Last year tens of thousands of young people took to the streets across Thailand to call for democratic reforms that aim to make the establishment more accountable and society more just. The protests, mostly led by university students, called for curbing the power and wealth of the monarchy, for Prime Minister Prayuth Chan-ocha, a former army general who first came to power through a coup, to resign, and for the constitution to be convened by army officials , should be reformed. The message was serious, but the rallies were peaceful and often had a festive atmosphere, with playful protest art and even satirical dress.

Some protesters used gasoline bombs.
Some protesters used gasoline bombs. Photo: Phobthum Yingpaiboonsuk / SOPA I / REX / Shutterstock

None of the protesters’ demands were met.

Instead, more than 1,000 people are charged with political activities, including at least 132 charges of lese majesty, which can lead to 15 years in prison. The main protesters have repeatedly been refused bail release.

Citizen or slave?

In Din Daeng, the demonstrators say they are no longer patient. “It’s as if they don’t see us as citizens, but as if they see us as slaves,” says Chai’s friend, who is 17 years old. Two of his family members, his aunt and uncle, died of Covid infection. “They have no connections so they had to wait and wait [for a hospital space]”He says. One of them died at home before he was properly treated. Like Chai, his family has financial problems. His mother used to work in a school canteen, but it closed. Instead, she sells street food and makes less money.”

Although Thailand managed to contain Covid in 2020, it has seen its worst wave in recent months after the cases quickly spread to slums, factories and prisons. The vaccination process was slow and chaotic. Those who could afford it flew abroad to get vaccines; if you can’t, you have to wait until it’s your turn. Chai’s father was vaccinated, but his mother has yet to be vaccinated.

Prior to Covid, vocational students fought over college rivalries rather than shoulder to shoulder, say Chai and his friends. Now, unlike Prayuth, they are united. Before gathering, they’ll explore where police checkpoints have been set up and plan possible escape routes. Their motto is: “Come together, go back together”.

Their demands remain the same as those of the demonstrators last year. “If Prayuth resigned, maybe everything could get better,” says one of the teenagers.

Some criticize the protesters for engaging in clashes with the police, argue that they cause trouble, undermine larger protests or legitimize the use of force by the authorities.

While both protesters and police officers have been injured, human rights groups warn that the police are excessive and indiscriminate. Earlier this month, 13 organizations wrote to the Prime Minister to express their concerns about the police response.

Paramedics on standby at Din Daeng Junction.
Paramedics on standby at Din Daeng Junction. Photo: Peerapon Boonyakiat / SOPA Image / REX / Shutterstock

Videos shared on social media appear to show police firing rubber bullets at protesters on motorcycles, including up close. In one clip, a police car hits a protester who falls to the ground before driving off; Police later said the van was being followed by protesters. In another incident in August, three teenagers were shot dead with live ammunition and one boy was in a coma.

Police say their use of force is in accordance with the law and deny using live ammunition.

“Many of them lost their parents to Covid”

Prajak Kongkirati, professor in the Political Science Faculty of Thammasat University, says the protesters’ confrontational tactics are driven by anger and frustration at the lack of reform, the leaderless nature of gatherings and, in some cases, the belief that they are driven by provocation they will “show the police how brutal the police and the current regime are”.

“They see the police as part of the system that oppresses them and their families,” he says.

The attitude towards Thailand’s youth protests, which have broken a deeply rooted taboo by calling for a monarchy reform, is polarized. Protesters say some Din Daeng residents have offered shelter and protected them from the police; others apparently reported them to the authorities. Some just have enough of the noisy crashes and the resulting damage to property.

Many sections of the Thai public, even if they do not approve of their tactics, are increasingly compassionate as more is known about the protesters and their backgrounds, says Prajak. “They are under 18 years old, some are only 13 or 14 years old … Many of them have lost their parents to Covid, many of their parents have lost their jobs, so they had to give up training,” he says.

A 22mm bullet and a rubber bullet were found by a protester.
A 22mm bullet and a rubber bullet were found by a protester. Photo: Phobthum Yingpaiboonsuk / SOPA I / REX / Shutterstock

The Covid outbreak caused a lull in the mass protests that swept Thailand in 2020, but rallies have increased in recent weeks. Former red shirt leaders have spearheaded “automobs” where protesters gather in their cars and on motorcycles to reduce the risk of Covid. Even members of the elite, including Tanat Thanakitamnuay, a former ultra-royalist, have supported calls for political change. At a protest in August, he lost sight in his right eye after being struck by what was believed to be a tear gas canister.

Dr. Punchada Sirivunnabood, a visiting fellow at the ISEAS-Yusof Ishak Institute in Singapore says there is “a high potential for major protests after the Covid situation has improved”.

The government, Prajak adds, is faced with a dilemma over whether to lift the restrictions. The protests in Din Daeng remain small, but the reopening of the country could lead to many more young people taking to the streets. “Their ideology has not changed, their commitment to political struggle has not changed,” he says.

Chai says he will continue to protest until the government is dissolved. Police violence will not deter him or his friends. “It’ll even make us go out, we’ll get angrier,” he says. “It will be like this until Prayuth gets out.”

* Name has been changed to protect your identity

Additional coverage from Navaon Siradapuvadol

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Updated Website Details Positive COVID Cases in Montana Schools https://evasonphuket.com/updated-website-details-positive-covid-cases-in-montana-schools/ https://evasonphuket.com/updated-website-details-positive-covid-cases-in-montana-schools/#respond Thu, 23 Sep 2021 19:45:41 +0000 https://evasonphuket.com/updated-website-details-positive-covid-cases-in-montana-schools/ The school year has started interestingly so far. After spending much of the past year either in “distance learning” programs or in class masked, the children are eager to return to normal. Unfortunately, the return to “normal” means that children are getting sick. Parents know how to do it. When children are in school, they […]]]>

The school year has started interestingly so far. After spending much of the past year either in “distance learning” programs or in class masked, the children are eager to return to normal. Unfortunately, the return to “normal” means that children are getting sick. Parents know how to do it. When children are in school, they are prone to colds or just snotty noses. In my household we are only 10 days in the new school year and my 9-year-old has been at home with a bad cold for three days. What would have been a maximum of a day or two before the pandemic, but it’s different now. The idea of ​​sending a child to school with only mild symptoms of an illness seems wrong.

The COVID-19 pandemic is making parents nervous. Even a child’s smallest runny nose makes parents wonder if these are early signs of something worse. Now that the Delta variant is affecting more and more children, it’s no surprise parents start to feel anxious when their child comes home with a mild fever and cough.

KELLY SIKKEMA ABOUT UNSPLASH.COM

But how many of the K-12 students in Montana actually test positive for COVID 19? How many positive cases have been reported to your child’s school? A recently updated website called covidschooltracker.com has a full list of the reported positive cases in every single K-12 school across the state of Montana. The website also contains reported positive cases for Montana colleges and universities.

All information comes directly from the Montana Communicable Diseases Epidemiology / MT DPHHS.

In pictures: What education looks like worldwide during a pandemic

LOOK: Answers to 30 Common Questions About COVID-19 Vaccines

While much is still unknown about the coronavirus and the future, it is known that the vaccines currently available have gone through all three phases of testing and are safe and effective. It will be necessary to vaccinate as many Americans as possible in order to finally return to some level of pre-pandemic normalcy, and hopefully these 30 answers provided here will help readers get vaccinated as soon as possible.

See stunning photos of the tourism industry during COVID-19

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Mandalas “The Story of Ram” celebrates Diwali on October 9th outdoors in Naper Settlement https://evasonphuket.com/mandalas-the-story-of-ram-celebrates-diwali-on-october-9th-outdoors-in-naper-settlement/ https://evasonphuket.com/mandalas-the-story-of-ram-celebrates-diwali-on-october-9th-outdoors-in-naper-settlement/#respond Wed, 22 Sep 2021 17:10:35 +0000 https://evasonphuket.com/mandalas-the-story-of-ram-celebrates-diwali-on-october-9th-outdoors-in-naper-settlement/ In celebration of the Indian holiday of Diwali, Mandala South Asian Performing Arts presents “The Story of Ram,” a family-friendly, immersive outdoor performance on Saturday October 9th. The performances will take place at 11:00 am, 2:00 pm and 5:00 pm at the historic Naper settlement, 523 S. Webster St. in Naperville. “The Story of Ram” […]]]>

In celebration of the Indian holiday of Diwali, Mandala South Asian Performing Arts presents “The Story of Ram,” a family-friendly, immersive outdoor performance on Saturday October 9th. The performances will take place at 11:00 am, 2:00 pm and 5:00 pm at the historic Naper settlement, 523 S. Webster St. in Naperville.

“The Story of Ram” is Mandala’s interpretation of the ancient epic Ramayana, a classic, cross-cultural narrative that creates a multi-dimensional play that combines contemporary culture and mythology. Artists share pieces of the rich tradition steeped in the epic, including dance, music, and puppetry. The story of Ram, his wife Sita and his brother Lakshman, exiled in the forest, permeates the arts across South and Southeast Asia – in contradiction to the brilliant King Ravana – and interweaves cultures from India, Indonesia, Thailand and more.

In its sixth year, Mandala’s “The Story of Ram” is taking place outdoors for the first time in the historic Naper Settlement to provide a completely immersive experience, with viewers interacting with the characters and moving around the environment.

Performers – depicting people and animals – include Mandalas Professional Ensemble, Gingarte Capoeira, Indonesian Dance of Illinois, Somapa Thai Dance Company from Washington DC, Thai Music @ Chicago, Chicago Kalakshetra (with ritual drumming from the Indian state of Kerala), and Die award-winning artists I Gusti Pak Ngurah Kertayuda, Laksha Dantran and as the monkey king Hanuman Ashwaty Chennat, Mandalas deputy artistic director.

Additionally, the Indian Government and Indian Consulate in Chicago are working with Mandala to welcome the Chitrakari Group and their leather art puppet show, which represents the 11th generation of this folk art form (tholubommalata).

“The Naper Settlement is a historic site that represents the history of Naperville, Illinois, United States, and The Story of Ram is a tradition that immigrated to the United States with immigrants from India,” said Pranita Nayar, mandala founder and executive artistic director. “So there are two cultural traditions that merge: the cultural artifact that existed and practiced traditions that were brought here with new waves of people.”

“We modeled the production after Shakespeare in the Parks and other mobile outdoor theaters. Our exciting challenge was to integrate intercultural and non-verbal performing arts into this structure, ”said Chennat.

Mandala’s annual holiday tradition, “The Story of Ram”, began as a collaboration between cultural workers – Pranita Nayar and I Gusti Pak Ngurah Kertayuda – as they explored the common mythology in their respective dance traditions: Bharatanatyam and Balinese dance. Their deliberations grew into a complete dance theater production for children and a diverse audience, celebrating the beauty of the cultural perspectives in the Chicago area.

Tickets are $ 25 for general admission at 11am and 2pm; Tickets for the 5:00 p.m. fundraiser are $ 100.

Tickets and information are available at mandalaarts.org/the-story-of-ram/.

All programming is subject to change.

The Mandala South Asian Performing Arts connects audiences and students with the vibrancy, taste and colors of the performing arts of South Asia and offers powerful engagement with unique and experienced dancers, musicians, storytellers, artists and educators whose origins date back to the Himalayas to the Indian Ocean, from Persia to Indonesia. Mandalas Ensemble dancers and musicians, teaching artists and artistic staff and mediation partners bring folk and classical traditions as well as current and hybrid innovations to life. Mandala promotes cultural awareness and exchange through entertainment and education.

“The Story of Ram” is supported by the City of Naperville Special Events & Cultural Facilities Program, the DuPage County Foundation, the Illinois Arts Council Agency, and the National Endowment for the Arts.

More information is available at mandalaarts.org.

]]> https://evasonphuket.com/mandalas-the-story-of-ram-celebrates-diwali-on-october-9th-outdoors-in-naper-settlement/feed/ 0 Philippines levy 12 percent tax on digital services • The Register https://evasonphuket.com/philippines-levy-12-percent-tax-on-digital-services-the-register/ https://evasonphuket.com/philippines-levy-12-percent-tax-on-digital-services-the-register/#respond Wed, 22 Sep 2021 03:58:00 +0000 https://evasonphuket.com/philippines-levy-12-percent-tax-on-digital-services-the-register/ The Philippines was the last country to levy a tax on digital services. Such taxes require Netflix and Spotify to pay local sales taxes even though their services – legal, fictional, and physical – are performed outside of local jurisdiction. The Philippines chose a rate of 12 percent, which reflects local sales tax. “We have […]]]>

The Philippines was the last country to levy a tax on digital services.

Such taxes require Netflix and Spotify to pay local sales taxes even though their services – legal, fictional, and physical – are performed outside of local jurisdiction.

The Philippines chose a rate of 12 percent, which reflects local sales tax.

“We have now made it clear that digital services and the goods and services traded via digital service providers should in principle be subject to VAT. It’s just a matter of common tax sense, “said Joey Salceda, a member of the Philippine House of Representatives and a supporter of the nation’s tax law amendment.

Salceda tied the change to the post-pandemic economic recovery.

“If the stationary businesses hardest hit by the pandemic have to pay VAT, the giants of e-commerce should not be excluded,” he said.

However, local companies that are already exempt from VAT due to low sales are not covered by the expansion of the tax into the virtual area.

Salceda’s changes are designed to capture content streamers as well as online software sales – including mobile apps – as well as SaaS and hosted software. In the report by the Philippine news agency on the entry into force of the amendment, firewalls are even mentioned as subject to VAT.

The Philippines aren’t the only ones implementing a digital services tax to generate more revenue after the COVID-19 pandemic hit government revenues – Indonesia followed the same logic in 2020.

But taxes are controversial because they are seen as a one-sided response to the general problem of choosing multinationals in the jurisdiction in which they will pay taxes – a practice that undermines national tax bases. The G7 group of countries and the OECD believe that collaborations that shift tax liabilities to countries where goods and services are purchased and consumed are the most appropriate answers, and that harmonizing global tax laws so that big tech can be found everywhere pays where they operate a better plan than taxes on digital services.

The US has supported this view of taxes on digital services by announcing that it will impose tariffs on the countries that adopt them – but that plan has yet to be implemented.

In the meantime, it is taking years to agree and implement the process of creating a global approach to multinational tax fraud.

But the Philippines want more cash in their coffers – and to show that local businesses are not being penalized – as soon as possible. ®

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Could a Singapore Domestic Worker Program be a model to change the Hong Kong housing scheme for volunteers ?, Singapore News https://evasonphuket.com/could-a-singapore-domestic-worker-program-be-a-model-to-change-the-hong-kong-housing-scheme-for-volunteers-singapore-news/ https://evasonphuket.com/could-a-singapore-domestic-worker-program-be-a-model-to-change-the-hong-kong-housing-scheme-for-volunteers-singapore-news/#respond Sun, 19 Sep 2021 03:30:00 +0000 https://evasonphuket.com/could-a-singapore-domestic-worker-program-be-a-model-to-change-the-hong-kong-housing-scheme-for-volunteers-singapore-news/ Sampoorna Narayanan, 36, is happy. She works five and a half days a week as a part-time housewife and lives with three friends in an apartment not far from central Singapore. She can decide for herself what she wants to cook for her meals and can move around freely. Narayanan’s current life is a far […]]]>

Sampoorna Narayanan, 36, is happy. She works five and a half days a week as a part-time housewife and lives with three friends in an apartment not far from central Singapore. She can decide for herself what she wants to cook for her meals and can move around freely. Narayanan’s current life is a far cry from what she lived before 2019 when she was a domestic servant.

Previously, Narayanan had to rely on her employers on call. While working for four different households within six years, the job requirements always seemed to be the same. She would wake up before sunrise to prepare breakfast for the family, then spend the day doing housework and also taking care of children or elderly members of the household.

“No freedom, only once a week [I get to] going out, ”said Narayanan, who like most of her fellow workers had a day off on Sunday.

Sampoorna Narayanan. PHOTO: Handout

What changed for Narayanan was that the government launched a pilot program that allowed foreign workers who specialize in domestic servants to work for businesses instead of households.

This household services program, which started in 2017 but has been permanent since this month, hires and accommodates women from India, Myanmar, Sri Lanka, Cambodia and Thailand by companies that assign them part-time cleaning duties.

For these women, who would otherwise live as helpers with their employers, the system means more freedom, more regular working hours and better pay. You also benefit from better occupational safety. As employees under the Household Services Scheme, women are subject to the Singapore Employment Act, which allows for a maximum of 44 hours a week, a minimum of seven days of annual vacation and a wide range of other safeguards.

Domestic workers gather on a patch of grass behind Somerset MRT station in Singapore. PHOTO: South China Morning Mail

These benefits are denied to people who work as domestic helpers who instead fall under the Scarcity of Foreign Labor Act, which does not provide for vacation or working hours.

The Foreign Employment Act states that women should have “adequate” rest, but leaves it up to employers to decide how much sleep per day is considered “appropriate”.. The only requirement for accommodation is that the women are “adequately protected from environmental influences such as sun, rain or strong wind” and “adequately ventilated”.

Another benefit for those subject to the Household Services Scheme, according to the Humanitarian Organization for Migration Economics in Singapore, is that women are protected from the physical abuse that aides sometimes suffer from their employers.

Narayanan and many other workers like her say that working under the new system is preferable to life as a domestic helper. “Lwin,” a former Myanmar domestic worker, said the change had improved her bottom line.

“[Working as a] Cleaning lady is better because it’s a part-time job, I can stay out and get a higher salary, ”she said.

Migrant women working as domestic workers march to the Indonesian Consulate General in Causeway Bay, Hong Kong to protest for better working conditions. PHOTO: File South China Morning Post

After switching to the system, she worked both as a part-time cleaner and later as an assistant in a nursing home, but is considering returning to cleaning in order to make more money.

She made $ 450 to $ 500 a month as a housekeeper, while she made about $ 1,300 a month as a housekeeper (though a few hundred dollars of that would go to her accommodation that she didn’t have to pay for.) as a home helper). Narayanan’s finances are similar: she made $ 450 to $ 500 as a housekeeper and now makes $ 1,150 (of which $ 280 for housing).

The popularity of the program is growing. Singapore’s Ministry of Labor said it had grown from 15 companies in 2017 to 76 companies now. The companies offer cleaning services to more than 10,000 households. The pilot could only offer cleaning services, but companies can now also offer services such as grocery shopping, car washing and pet care.

[[nid:543803]]

At the moment, however, companies cannot provide child and elderly care – services that many households request from foreign domestic workers. Housekeeping companies may also employ local cleaners.

Narayanan’s employer, Clean Lab, said it has hired 12 overseas women and plans to hire five more. Business grew 50 percent last year, said Kelvin Chang, business development and human resources manager at Clean Lab.

Still, migrant workers groups said programs like this cannot fully replace home help in either Singapore or Hong Kong.

As of June, Singapore employed 245,600 foreign domestic workers, with almost one in five households employing a helper. Hong Kong has approximately 360,000 foreign domestic workers who make up one in seven households.

The migrant workers’ group Home said that many household helpers were hired by households who, in addition to cleaning, also had to take care of children and the elderly, which often overwhelmed them with tasks.

Housekeeping in Central, Hong Kong. PHOTO: South China Morning Mail

“Domestic workers have to act as babysitters, carers for children or the elderly, cooks, housekeepers, car cleaners, and for some even dog owners. Given that employers have become accustomed to having on-call help for most of the day and night, in multiple functions for a very small fee, there is no way of replacing domestic workers with the domestic services system, ”a spokesman said of the home.

Eni Lestari, a Hong Kong domestic worker and chair of the International Migrants Alliance, which has championed people in her industry for nearly two decades, said there was a similar situation in Hong Kong.

Hong Kong residents tended to work long hours and needed a helper to look after young children or older parents, Lestari said.

“Some families need part-time assistance, but these are high-class families or singles and couples with no children or the elderly,” she said.

[[nid:544170]]

The Hong Kong government’s policy of obliging all aides to live with their employers has been challenged in court, and workers said it increased their risk of being abused by demanding bosses.

However, the government claims that lifting the rule could have serious repercussions on Hong Kong’s economy and society, including potential pressures on the already tight housing market.

Both Lestari and Home said that despite some positive aspects, the household services system is also flawed.

Both said workers paid high brokerage fees in their home countries to get their jobs.

The former domestic servant from Myanmar said something similar: To become a part-time cleaner again (and earn a salary of $ 1,250 before working overtime), she would first have to pay her agent $ 1,800, a sum she said: ” so much “.

“Without the right to change jobs, workers are still faced with a power imbalance and unreasonable demands from their own employers,” Home said.

Lwin, using a pseudonym due to disputes with her employer, had worked as a part-time cleaner under the household services program but was exposed to what she perceived as inappropriate demands. This included sending her every day to a factory on the far eastern end of Singapore, where bus traffic was restricted, which meant she sometimes had to take a taxi.

Nor was she paid for overtime. When she raised these issues with her employer, they quit their employment and wanted to fly her back to Myanmar when Home intervened.

Lestari said the women who worked under the Household Services Scheme are still “not free” and controlled by employers and agencies. “It’s becoming a trap and you have to stay and stay,” she said.

However, she agreed that the system had a silver lining as its workers were covered by the Employment Act. Lestari said her organization has “many, many times” requested similar legal safeguards for domestic workers in Hong Kong.

“The first solution is really not whether we live in a household or are employed by a company, it is for governments to get us involved in labor law – I think that’s the best protection everyone should have,” she said.

And for Lestari, this also includes the right to change jobs. “Who wants to be a domestic servant for the rest of their lives? But many countries don’t really recognize that. Once you are a domestic worker you can be for 20 or 30 years, but you cannot move to other jobs even if you are qualified and qualified. “

This article was first published in South china morning post.

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Scholarship Denied, Hafeesha’s incredible journey from a poor family to a UK university in trouble – The New Indian Express https://evasonphuket.com/scholarship-denied-hafeeshas-incredible-journey-from-a-poor-family-to-a-uk-university-in-trouble-the-new-indian-express/ https://evasonphuket.com/scholarship-denied-hafeeshas-incredible-journey-from-a-poor-family-to-a-uk-university-in-trouble-the-new-indian-express/#respond Sat, 18 Sep 2021 04:57:00 +0000 https://evasonphuket.com/scholarship-denied-hafeeshas-incredible-journey-from-a-poor-family-to-a-uk-university-in-trouble-the-new-indian-express/ Express message service KOZHIKODE: Hafeesha TB, 25, from a poor family in Thrissur, has had a stormy road to admission to the Masters program at the University of Sussex, England. Her academic profile catapulted her to Sussex, which is ranked 146th worldwide. But all of this academic profile seems insignificant to the Kerala State Backward […]]]>

Express message service

KOZHIKODE: Hafeesha TB, 25, from a poor family in Thrissur, has had a stormy road to admission to the Masters program at the University of Sussex, England.

Her academic profile catapulted her to Sussex, which is ranked 146th worldwide. But all of this academic profile seems insignificant to the Kerala State Backward Classes Development Corporation (KSBCDC), as it denied Hafeesha her OBC scholarship abroad on the grounds of a “high annual income.”

From the 230 applicants, 21 students were selected for the 2020-21 scholarship. “I was shocked to find out that I was disfellowshipped. Of the 21, only eight study at universities that are in the 1-200 ranking. The other 13 have enrolled in universities that fall into the 201-600 ranking. According to the government ordinance of 2014, only students studying at universities from one to 200 should receive the scholarship. The selection process was against the rules, ”she claimed, citing RTI’s responses.

“It also had a weighting for field experience that the selection committee ignored. The logic of rejecting an applicant with PG was another violation,” she said.

Hafeesha had worked with subaltern groups in five countries and lectured at many national and international conferences. Her article on the Wayanad Tribal Education Project was recently published by the British Council, Thailand.

All hopes were for scholarships

Hafeesha had put all her hopes on the scholarship to complete her studies.

“I came to the UK after mortgaging only five cents of land to my BPL family. I fought here and did part-time jobs to survive. But all my efforts are now in vain. Authorities say scholarships have been awarded to students with annual earnings up to Rs 48,000. Mine was 50,000 rupees, “she said.

“It is easy to get admission to low-ranking universities abroad. Many students seek admission to such universities in order to migrate to other countries,” she added.

“I am on the verge of suicide. I had overcome all obstacles in life with my passion for academics. It is my third rental in the UK in a year for financial reasons. I will not complain when all of those who have received scholarships have won” study at high-level universities or have an excellent academic background, “she added.

Hafeesha had sent many emails including governor, prime minister, university minister, and is waiting for a positive response.

Income the last criterion: Dept

When TNIE contacted KSBCDC, the superintendent said it was based on a government ordinance that income should be considered above earnings.

“OBC candidates with annual earnings less than Rs 6 lakh may apply under the rules. However, we have only allocated Rs 1.10 crore for providing scholarships for 2020-21. Final selection will not be made by the department but a senior government committee, “he explained.

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Apple and Google remove ‘Navalny’ voting app in Russia https://evasonphuket.com/apple-and-google-remove-navalny-voting-app-in-russia/ https://evasonphuket.com/apple-and-google-remove-navalny-voting-app-in-russia/#respond Fri, 17 Sep 2021 22:16:25 +0000 https://evasonphuket.com/apple-and-google-remove-navalny-voting-app-in-russia/ The Russian government had been more and more open in recent days to prevent the app from being used with detention threats. “With the participation of Apple and Google, specific crimes are being committed, the extent of which could increase in the coming days,” said Vladimir Jabarov, a member of the Russian upper house of […]]]>

The Russian government had been more and more open in recent days to prevent the app from being used with detention threats.

“With the participation of Apple and Google, specific crimes are being committed, the extent of which could increase in the coming days,” said Vladimir Jabarov, a member of the Russian upper house of parliament, on Thursday. “People who help circumvent the responsibility of their parent companies on the territory of the Russian Federation will be punished.”

It remains to be seen whether the admission by Apple and Google on Friday turns into a turning point in how energetically American tech giants are resisting pressure from the Kremlin. As Russia cracks down on dissenting opinions this year, the most popular Silicon Valley platforms remain open to the public so journalists and activists can continue to spread their message. On YouTube, for example, the Navalny team’s investigations into corruption among the Russian elite regularly receive millions of clicks.

But Friday’s move could encourage the Kremlin, as well as governments in other parts of the world, to use threats of prosecuting employees to put pressure on companies. It is a test of Silicon Valley ideals around free speech and an open internet that are weighed not only against profit, but also against the safety of their workers.

Removal of Facebook and Twitter posts, YouTube videos, and other internet content happens fairly regularly as companies try to comply with local laws around the world. In China, Apple removed apps that conflicted with state censorship, including software that would give Chinese users access to the open global internet. A 2016 court ruling in Russia led Apple and Google to remove LinkedIn from their app stores after LinkedIn failed to comply with a law requiring data about Russian users to be stored within national borders.

But the Google and Apple removals on Friday would have little precedent given the turnout and high profile campaign by Mr Navalny against the Kremlin, said Natalia Krapiva, legal advisor to Access Now, a civil society group that tracks internet censorship. “This is really a new phenomenon to be explored in the app stores,” said Ms. Krapiva.

While companies would prefer to be viewed as impartial platforms, Ms. Krapiva said industry leaders should do more to defend free speech and an open internet, especially if company employees are threatened with criminal prosecution.

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Chiang Mai, Thailand struggles without international tourists https://evasonphuket.com/chiang-mai-thailand-struggles-without-international-tourists/ https://evasonphuket.com/chiang-mai-thailand-struggles-without-international-tourists/#respond Thu, 16 Sep 2021 04:07:30 +0000 https://evasonphuket.com/chiang-mai-thailand-struggles-without-international-tourists/ Chiang Mai, Thailand (CNN) – Before the pandemic, Chiang Mai received around four million international visitors annually, according to the Thai Tourism Authority (TAT). However, the economic impact of Covid-19 on this tourist town and province of the same name in northern Thailand was downright devastating, as many travel companies closed and thousands of people […]]]>

Chiang Mai, Thailand (CNN) – Before the pandemic, Chiang Mai received around four million international visitors annually, according to the Thai Tourism Authority (TAT).

However, the economic impact of Covid-19 on this tourist town and province of the same name in northern Thailand was downright devastating, as many travel companies closed and thousands of people lost their jobs.

The Chiang Mai Province tourism sector is estimated to have lost over 60 billion baht (about $ 1.8 billion) in revenue from January to June 2021, according to Watcharayu Kuawong, director of TAT’s Chiang Mai office.

But for operators of touristic-dependent businesses who have managed to hold their own, relief could finally be on the way.

Thailand’s cautious steps to reopen its borders continue, with the government announcing plans to welcome vaccinated travelers to five additional destinations in October – Bangkok, Phetchaburi, Prachuap Khiri Khan, Chonburi and Chiang Mai.
The details of the reopening plan are thin at the moment, but it is possible that it shares similarities with the Phuket Sandbox and Samui Plus programs. Introduced in July, they allow vaccinated tourists to stay on the islands without going into quarantine – although they are still subject to some restrictions.

Mass vaccinations are now being carried out in Chiang Mai, including in the Promenada Shopping Mall shown here.

Courtesy Ron Emmons

In late August, the Thai Center for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) was presented with a scheme called “Charming Chiang Mai,” which is similar to the Phuket sandbox. It suggests offering vaccinated visitors a selection of travel packages they need to book to visit, e.g. B. a family package or a golf package.

“Chiang Mai has many entry and exit routes, as opposed to the sandpit areas of Phuket and Samui, which are easier to control,” says Watcharayu.

“In addition, to implement the program, at least 70% of the local population must be vaccinated in order to create herd immunity.”

Initially, officials will reportedly allow four counties to open in the province: Muang (Central), Mae Rim, Mae Taeng and Doi Tao. According to local media reports, these are the areas with the most vaccinated residents.

Elephant camps have to be closed

One of Chiang Mai’s most popular tourist attractions is the elephant camps, of which around 80 were in operation before the pandemic.

Most have since closed, however some remain open and cater to domestic tourists.

“Financially, Covid was a catastrophe for us,” says Anchalee Kalmapijit, the owner of the park.

“Our monthly spending is about 3 million baht ($ 90,000) and we can’t do that with just local visitors. We’ve had to lay off nearly 200 people, and of the remaining 120, most of the work half part-time. “Numbers.”

The Masea Elephant Conservation Park in Chiang Mai.

The Masea Elephant Conservation Park in Chiang Mai.

Courtesy Ron Emmons

For ethical reasons, the camp no longer offers elephant shows or rides.

“Entry to the park is currently free, but we recommend that visitors buy a fruit basket to feed the elephants.” says Anchalee. “You can also take part in activities like preparing food and bathing the elephants.

“During the pandemic, we tried other ways to generate income, such as selling our own brand of coffee in the park and on social media. Plus, we get a lot of manure on 71 elephants, so we developed an organic fertilizer too.” that we market. “

Further down the road is The Chang, Maesa Elephant Conservation Park’s refuge for sick and elderly elephants. There are no chains or hooks and the mahouts (trainers) don’t ride them so they can enjoy a happy retirement, says Anchalee.

“Some elephant lovers who cannot visit have been kind enough to adopt an elephant through our website. They will then receive a monthly update on the welfare of their chosen elephant,” she says.

“Online teaching was not really compatible”

Other popular activities in Chiang Mai include Thai cooking classes, Muay Thai, massage, and meditation, but these, too, have been paid off by the pandemic.

Homprang Chaleekanha, owner of Baan Hom Samunphrai Thai Massage School, says Covid-19 has severely affected her business.

“Ours is an inhabited school and when the pandemic broke out we were fully booked for the year, but unfortunately we had to close because students couldn’t come here,” she says.

“We have tried to reach prospective students by offering Zoom courses in herbal medicine as well as Rasidaton (Thai yoga) which is based on Thai massage stretches, the kind of hands-on, personal, physically intimate instruction that our courses require. So now we are waiting in the hope that one day students will be able to visit our school again. “

Tha Pae Road, the main street of Chiang Mai.

Tha Pae Road, the main street of Chiang Mai.

Courtesy Ron Emmons

The streets in the center of Chiang Mai are incredibly quiet these days, with many shops closed and closed. Before the pandemic, tour operators occupied many of these buildings.

One tour operator considering closing her business is Annette Kunigagon, who has doubts about the planned reopening plan for Chiang Mai.

“Visitors to Chiang Mai are mostly independent travelers who want to learn about the city’s culture and explore the stunning natural surroundings of the north,” she says.

“They have a very different focus than the beach tourists who visit Phuket. They may not like offering organized package tours, although there are some visitors who are comfortable traveling this way.”

A novice walks past the Buddhist temple Wat Chedi Luang in Chiang Mai on October 31, 2020.

A novice walks past the Buddhist temple Wat Chedi Luang in Chiang Mai on October 31, 2020.

Mladen Antonov / AFP / Getty Images

Gade Gray, who owns a small boutique hotel called Ellieum in Old Town, says she will have to find other ways to earn an income until international tourists return.

“We have to focus on optimizing the use of our kitchen, so we sell bento boxes, spreads and Thai dips,” says Gade.

“With donated food and money, we also prepare meals for the homeless and frontline personnel in the field hospitals, which shows the friendliness of the Thais and how we try to help each other as a community.”

Opening of new luxury hotels

Doi Inthanon National Park in Chiang Mai is home to the highest mountain in Thailand.

Doi Inthanon National Park in Chiang Mai is home to the highest mountain in Thailand.

Courtesy Ron Emmons

Despite the worrying situation, the city’s tourism industry is hoping for an eventual recovery, as the planned opening of new five-star hotels in Chiang Mai by the international chains Melia and InterContinental shows.

The Melia is scheduled to open in the fourth quarter of 2021 and the InterContinental in 2022.

Edward E. Snoeks, General Manager of Melia Chiang Mai, hopes that the Charming Chiang Mai Plan will be implemented.

“A project similar to the Phuket Sandbox is a helpful and productive idea as it opens up new opportunities for Chiang Mai’s tourism sector,” he says.

“It looks like it will work in Phuket and can be a success in Chiang Mai, provided we act responsibly and follow all necessary health and safety protocols.”

This photo was taken at the entrance of Doi Suthep Temple in Chiang Mai in November 2020.  The popular destination is usually packed with tourists.

This photo was taken at the entrance of Doi Suthep Temple in Chiang Mai in November 2020. The popular destination is usually packed with tourists.

Mladen Antonov / AFP / Getty Images

Forward

The planned reopening takes place on the eve of Thailand’s traditional high season from November to February. But external obstacles stand in the way of recovery.

Travelers to China – which made up nearly 30% of Thailand’s international arrivals prior to the pandemic – are still being deterred from leaving the country and are subject to strict quarantine restrictions on return.

In August, the US and UK put Thailand on their “red lists”, which simply means “don’t go”.

At the time, Thailand was reporting over 20,000 new Covid-19 cases every day. However, that number has dropped to below 15,000 a day on average, in line with rising vaccination rates and a severe lockdown in the hardest hit areas, including Bangkok, in July.

In early September, restrictions in Bangkok were partially lifted to allow restaurants and shopping malls to open, while airlines resumed domestic flights between major centers.

How does the route to the northern capital of Thailand look like?

“The first thing to do is speed up the distribution of vaccines,” said La-iad Bungsrithong, president of the Northern Chapter of the Thai Hotels Association.

“Then we have to set up a tourism committee that represents all tourism businesses and promotes domestic travel until we can welcome international visitors again.”

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Study finds no connection between increasing deforestation and the COVID crisis https://evasonphuket.com/study-finds-no-connection-between-increasing-deforestation-and-the-covid-crisis/ https://evasonphuket.com/study-finds-no-connection-between-increasing-deforestation-and-the-covid-crisis/#respond Tue, 14 Sep 2021 17:15:00 +0000 https://evasonphuket.com/study-finds-no-connection-between-increasing-deforestation-and-the-covid-crisis/ Macroeconomic analysis suggests that deforestation trends have not changed significantly over the past year as a direct result of the COVID-19 pandemic. It was expected that lockdowns and layoffs, as well as the unprecedented stimulus spending in response, would lead to spike in deforestation, but this was not the case, the analysis shows. Still, campaign […]]]>
  • Macroeconomic analysis suggests that deforestation trends have not changed significantly over the past year as a direct result of the COVID-19 pandemic.
  • It was expected that lockdowns and layoffs, as well as the unprecedented stimulus spending in response, would lead to spike in deforestation, but this was not the case, the analysis shows.
  • Still, campaign groups say there are signs of unsustainable forest products expansion plans in Asia.
  • Conservationists urge world leaders to use the climate conference later this year to make recovery programs more sustainable.

When the COVID-19 pandemic first broke out and national governments responded with bans to varying degrees, conservationists warned that it would spur illegal logging in tropical countries. They argued that with fewer eyes and ears to monitor, coupled with a rapid supply of short-time workers in the form of unemployed people migrating from the cities to their home villages, the world’s rainforests would inevitably suffer a blow.

In fact, environmental activists interviewed by Mongabay in June 2020, just months after the pandemic began, said their organizations had already seen signs of increased illegal activity.

But according to new research in Forest policy and economy, The various forces acting on the global macroeconomy have largely balanced each other out, so the increase in deforestation in one part of the world has been offset by declines in other parts.

Global Forest Watch (GFW) found that tropical forest tree cover decreased by 12.2 million hectares (30.5 million acres) in 2020, up 12% from 2019 levels, according to the new Paper. That is an area almost the size of Greece.

However, the researchers write that the analysis should focus on a “three-year moving data average that continues to decline in 2020 with the large declines from 2016 to 2018”. This is because the loss ratios in 2020 were still well below those of 2016 or 2017, so that the three-year average 2018-2020 is significantly lower than in the two previous periods (2016-2018 and 2017-2019).

The trends in the three largest tropical forest countries – Brazil, the Democratic Republic of the Congo (DRC) and Indonesia – continued largely unaffected by the COVID-19 crisis.

Forest road in Gabon in 2021. Image by ZB / Mongabay.

During the pandemic, there were three main drivers of the global economy, all of which were pushing in different directions: supply-side constraints, declining demand, and then the impact of government financial packages to stimulate economies.

“We have found that deforestation-inhibiting and deforestation-enhancing factors have practically neutralized each other so far,” the authors report.

The paper questions other studies linking reports of increasing deforestation to the pandemic. A study by WWF Germany found that forest disturbance warnings in the period February-June 2020 increased by 77% compared to the same period in 2016-2019. The WWF attributed the increase to “accelerated loss of forest management and increased land grabbing during the government lockdown”.

Other reports, such as the aforementioned Mongabay, “linked” tropical forest data from Global Land Analysis and Discovery (GLAD) “causally” with anecdotal accounts of deforestation, the paper says.

“The general problem in justifying these studies is timing,” the authors write. “Many tropical countries had not yet taken lockdown measures when registering higher GLAD warnings. In fact, countries with the sharpest rise in deforestation warnings in February / March, such as Colombia or Thailand, were not closed until the end of March. This timing discrepancy effectively renders any statement attributable to a suspension invalid. “

Lead author Sven Wunder, senior scientist at the European Forest Institute, told Mongabay in an interview that even now – more than a year and a half since the pandemic broke out – it is too early to say what long-term effects COVID-19 will be.

“We had this very strong fiscal reaction dominating things, but it can’t go on like this,” said Wunder. “If you let these stimulus programs run out, what will happen?”

Logging in the Amazon in 2020. Image courtesy of Fabio Nascimento.

Historically, a booming economy almost always leads to increased deforestation because it stimulates greater demand for raw materials and more investment in land use projects, Wunder said. The money that has been injected into the global economy since the outbreak of the COVID-19 pandemic has influenced reactions to other global crises such as the great recession of 2008 or the US Marshall Plan, the aid program for Western European countries to support their economies after the World War, dwarfed II.

The paper’s figures show that the stimulus packages in major European countries such as France, Germany and the UK were ten times the size of 2008. However, Wunder says the measures cannot go on like this and that it was not a booming decade like the 1920s after the end of the First World War and the Spanish flu.

Frances Seymour, Senior Fellow of the World Resources Institute (WRI), told Mongabay that Miracle’s paper offers a useful perspective on the overall impact of the pandemic on global deforestation rates, but was surprised at one point.

“It was interesting to note that they discount a 12% increase in tree cover loss with primary forest loss as insignificant,” she said. “When the rest of the world economy was shrinking and you can still have a 12% increase, that’s amazing. It is an indicator of the resilience of the various drivers that lead to forest loss. “

Seymour added that her long-term concern is that environmental issues will move further down the priority list as governments seek to help their economies recover from the effects of the pandemic.

“When governments are in crisis, they understandably focus on short-term job creation programs rather than thinking about the sustainability of those jobs,” she said. “There is also a tendency to become more protectionist so that one is not so dependent on the world economy. Both are bad for the forest. “

Daniel Carrillo, director of forest campaigns for the Rainforest Action Network (RAN), says there is clear evidence that fiscal stimulus programs continue to fuel unsustainable business practices. In the past few months, he said, Asia’s two largest pulp and paper companies, Asia Pacific Resources International Ltd (APRIL) and Asia Pulp & Paper (APP), both announced plans to expand their facilities.

APRIL’s proposed expansion of its pulp production capacity to 5.8 million tons per year in Sumatra, Indonesia, could endanger 120,000 hectares of natural forest, according to an analysis by an environmental group. APP’s OKI facility in southern Sumatra will more than double as part of its proposals to increase production capacity to 7 million tons per year.

“The fiscal stimulus is happening and these two companies are announcing these expansion plans at the same time, and we see these two things as linked,” Carrillo told Mongabay. “We are concerned about these plans because pulp mills have been responsible for deforestation, land conflicts and violations of indigenous peoples’ rights for decades.”

Now, says Carrillo, it is important that world leaders at the COP26 climate summit in Glasgow, Scotland, in November, address the question of how recovery programs can be made more sustainable.

“There is an opportunity to study the impact of these fiscal incentives and how indigenous communities have been excluded,” he said.

Smallholder deforestation in Borneo, Indonesia. Image by Rhett A. Butler / Mongabay.

The pandemic has made those who are at the forefront of forest protection more vulnerable, said Aina Grødahl, senior advisor at Rainforest Foundation Norway, which has mapped the consequences of the coronavirus pandemic among 60 indigenous and environmental groups in tropical rainforest countries.

“Actions emerging from the pandemic, such as lockdown and martial law, have impaired the ability of environmental police and other societal functions to counter land invasions and illegal activity,” she said.

Seymour says the single biggest single impact of COVID-19 could be how it affects the popularity of world leaders like Jair Bolsonaro, the controversial president of Brazil. Bolsonaro enacted policy that harmed the Amazon rainforest long before the coronavirus emerged, but now the question is whether the pandemic – and how Brazil responded to it – fueled or undermined it.

“The likelihood of Bolsonaro being re-elected – that dynamic is most important to the future of the Amazon,” she said.

Quote:

Wunder S., Kaimowitz D., Jensen S. & Feder S. (2021). Coronavirus, Macroeconomics, and Forests: What Likely Impact? Forest Policy and Economics, 131. doi: 10.1016 / j.forpol.2021.102536

Similar hearing from Mongabay’s podcast: Acclaimed Guardian environmental journalist John Vidal shares the pandemic’s links to wildlife trade and the destruction of nature:

Banner image of a lumberjack in a forest by FotoRieth via Pixabay.

Conservation, Coronavirus, COVID-19, Deforestation, Environment, Forest Loss, Forests, Global Forest Watch, Illegal Logging, Logging, Pandemics, Rainforest Deforestation, Rainforest Destruction, Rainforest Deforestation, Tropical Deforestation, Tropical Forests, Zoonotic Diseases


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Believe it or not, “expensive” Japan is actually undervalued https://evasonphuket.com/believe-it-or-not-expensive-japan-is-actually-undervalued/ https://evasonphuket.com/believe-it-or-not-expensive-japan-is-actually-undervalued/#respond Sat, 11 Sep 2021 00:45:13 +0000 https://evasonphuket.com/believe-it-or-not-expensive-japan-is-actually-undervalued/ In the annual lists of the world’s most expensive cities, Tokyo was usually placed at or near the top. Take the Mercer Cost of Living Survey, which recently surveyed 209 cities on five continents. When measuring the comparative cost of more than 200 items such as shelter, transportation, food, etc., Ashgabat, Turkmenistan, turned out to […]]]>

In the annual lists of the world’s most expensive cities, Tokyo was usually placed at or near the top.

Take the Mercer Cost of Living Survey, which recently surveyed 209 cities on five continents. When measuring the comparative cost of more than 200 items such as shelter, transportation, food, etc., Ashgabat, Turkmenistan, turned out to be the most expensive. It was followed by Hong Kong (which took first place in 2019 and 2020) and Beirut. Tokyo took fourth place, with the top 10 rounded off by Zurich, Shanghai, Singapore, Geneva, Beijing and Bern in Switzerland.

Given Tokyo’s longstanding reputation as an expensive place to live, the August 28th cover story in Weekly Diamond deserves praise for grabbing reader attention with the defiant headline, “Japan Is Too Cheap.”

Diamond cited some solid arguments in support of his claims: For example, Japanese workers in the Group of Seven – Canada, France, Germany, Italy, Japan, the United Kingdom, and the United States – receive the second lowest average minimum wage after the United States, around 30 % lower than the country with the highest, France.

In a graph showing the average purchasing power of citizens in the 35 member countries of the OCED (Organization for Economic Cooperation and Development), Japan is in 22nd place, three places behind South Korea in 19th place.

According to OCED data, average wages in Japan have also been rising since the beginning of the 21st.

South Korea’s average wage dwarfed Japan in 2015, and the gap has widened further, with a difference from last year of the equivalent of $ 3,445 – about 379,000 yen, or 31,600 yen on a monthly basis.

The remuneration for leadership positions in Japan is particularly low: When Diamond magazine and Mother’s Japan carried out a 15-nation comparison of wage levels for grassroots workers, department heads, department heads and executives in mid-2020, it found that executives rated Japan 30% lower than China, 20% lower than South Korea and several percentage points lower than the Philippines, Indonesia and Thailand.

Tokyo’s reputation as an expensive city was exposed in a July survey conducted by Diamond’s price comparisons for various consumer goods in six cities of London, New York, Seoul, Shanghai, Singapore and Tokyo. Tokyo took fourth place with 127 yen for a 1.5 liter bottle of water; at ¥ 259 for a dozen medium-sized eggs, fifth; for 380 yen for a large cafe latte at Starbucks, sixth; at ¥ 995 for a Big Mac hamburger, fifth; at 8,201 yen for mid-range Nike running shoes, sixth; and for 995 for a dinner in a medium-priced restaurant in fourth place. Tokyo’s best-placed item was second place for a starting price for taxis at 420 yen.

Ryutaro Kono, chief economist at BNP Paribas Securities, told Diamond that he believed Japan’s low ranking was mainly due to polarization in the labor market.

“Extraordinarily employed (part-time workers and employees of manual mail-order companies) made up 36.7% of all employees in the first quarter of 2021,” he says. “These workers have few options for on-the-job training or off-site training, so their productivity does not increase. And less is spent on their ‘off-the-job training’.

“In other countries salaries are tied to a job description and pay the same salaries for the same type of work. Japan did not adopt this system, so wages are not determined by the content of a ‘job’ but by the person who is hired. “

The surveys carried out regularly are a reliable measure of the employees’ disposable income kozukai, the pocket money paid monthly by their wives to male wage earners. That year, a PR Times poll found husbands in families with children were getting 30,338 yen a month – an increase of just 816 yen from a Shinsei Bank poll eight years ago.

The PR Times poll was also revealing what husbands did to top up their monthly pocket money. For example, 41.4% of those surveyed stated that they had a part-time job in black. Among the other answers: 25.2% asked their spouse for more money; 6.2% made revolving payments by credit card; 5.0% borrowed from their parents; 1.8% borrowed against future wages; and finally 0.4% took short-term loans from a sarakin (Consumer financier).

Spa (August 31st to September 7th) saved the worst news for the last time. Authorized by a 2019 revision of the tax code aimed at “other income”, the tax office is preparing to levy income taxes over 200,000 yen per year. Taxes are levied not only on income from part-time jobs, but also on the sale of collectibles through flea markets, investing in common stocks, trading cryptocurrencies, and redeeming life insurance prematurely.

According to business journalist Shinichiro Suda, the introduction of the mandatory tax identification system “My Number” and the standardization of electronic tax returns have closed most of the loopholes in avoiding taxes on disposable income.

Suda believes that the average worker can expect a “big tax hike” after the coronavirus pandemic ends.

“It is not a mistake that in a few years time the Treasury Department will push through a tax increase with the possibility of increasing the consumption tax by 5% (from 10% now to 15%) for a limited period of time,” he predicts.

With stricter taxes on other income and the expectation of a higher excise tax rate, Spa provides for a “double blow” that will hit the wallets of the already hard-pressed illegal workers even harder.

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